One more cup of coffee...

Exhibition of breakfast sets and porcelain cups from the collection of the Museum of History of Katowice.

By The Museum of Katowice History

The mocha cup and saucer. (1952/1993) by "Bogucice” Porcelain PlantThe Museum of Katowice History

Porcelain cups

A cup is an object we can find in almost every household. Its function may be decorative, but it is predominantly a utilitarian object. Morning coffee or afternoon tea drinking remains popular in our times and porcelain cups are perfect for it.

What is porcelain? It is a type of ceramic material of a particular composition, which is cast, formed, subjected to thermal processing, decorated and fired again. A modern tea or coffee cup is a vessel modeled on cups used for drinking tea in the Far East. Are all cups the same? Certainly not! Such objects may have various shapes and capacity. Traditionally, cups for flat white coffee, for mocha and for tea were produced. They were part of breakfast and dinnerwar sets.

Breakfest set (1960/1969) by Ceramic Products Factory ”Steatyt”The Museum of Katowice History

Museum’s porcelain collection

Porcelain cups in the collection of the Museum of Katowice History exemplify perfect artistic craft from the interwar period and are an ”embodiment” of the ideas of industrial designers of the 1950s and 1960s. The exhibition presents also cups from the Katowice factory which was one of few private porcelain plants in the Polish People’s Republic. Only a section of the museum’s porcelain collection can be seen at the exhibition which is aimed at familiarizing the viewer with an interesting fragment of our collection.

The selected exhibits come from four porcelain factories: ”Giesche”, ”Huta Franciszka”, ”Bogucice” and ”Steatyt”.  Breakfast sets, flat white coffee cups, teacups  and mocha cups with saucers – they are characterised by variety of styles, shapes  and decorations, ranging from decal to hand painted patterns.

signature Giesche (1929/1939)The Museum of Katowice History

”Giesche” Porcelain Factory

The ”Giesche” porcelain factory was the only porcelain producer in Katowice in the interwar period. It was established in 1923,  based on a small plant producing electrotechnical porcelain. Following the expansion of the range of products by tableware and bric-a-brac, ”Giesche” products started to compete with the output of the famous Ćmielów factory! Thin walled porcelain cups delight with their finery and artistic decoration.

Breakfast set (1929/1935) by ”Giesche” porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Handpainted decoration, the pattern made of gold relief.

Breakfast set (1929/1939) by "Giesche" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

"Empire" cup with handpainted decoration, the pattern made of gold relief - bird and flowers.

Breakfast set (1929/1939) by "Giesche" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Ivory colour glazed vessels with relief decoration, decorated with flower decal and palladium. Historical style.

The tea cup with saucer from Krystyna set (1929/1939) by "Giesche" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Art déco tea cup from "Krystyna" set. Design by Robert Gould in 1929.

The white coffee cup with saucer from 01 set. (1929/1935) by "Giesche" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Cup and saucer from "01" set, decorated with decal covering the whole surface of the vessels.

The mocha cup with saucer - Wanda (1929/1939) by "Giesche" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

The mocha cup with saucer - Łucja (1929/1939) by "Giesche" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Mocha cup and saucer from "Łucja" set, both objects covered with cobalt glazing and hand painted gold pattern of birds of paradise.

Handpainted gold bird and flowers!

signature Huta Franciszka (1935/1939)The Museum of Katowice History

"Huta Franciszka" Porcelain Factory

This factory was founded in 1929 in Bykowina (at present a district of Ruda Śląskiej). It was founded by Richard Czuday. Pink and ivory coloured porcelain products were manufactured there, among them tableware, vases and bonbonnieres. After World War II, ”Huta Franciszka” was transformed into a branch of ”Bogucice” Porcelain Plant, which operated until 1988. The exhibition presents, among others, examples of cups in art déco style or a set with ivory-coloured relief decoration.

Breakfast set (1935/1939) by "Huta Franciszka" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Breakfast set (1935/1939) by "Huta Franciszka" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Decorated with gold and vermillion. Art déco style.

The white coffee cup with saucer. (1935/1939) by "Huta Franciszka" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Ivory colour glazed vessels with relief decoration, decorated with flower decal.

The teacup and saucer (1935/1939) by "Huta Franciszka" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

The mocha cup and saucer (1935/1939) by "Huta Franciszka" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

Pink porcelain is obtained by adding copper to porcelain mass.

The mocha cup and saucers (1935/1939) by "Huta Franciszka" porcelain factoryThe Museum of Katowice History

signature Bogucice (1952/1993)The Museum of Katowice History

”Bogucice” Porcelain Plant

”Bogucice” Porcelain Plant was formed based on the former ”Giesche” factory in 1952. The first years of its operation  were devoted to creating entirely new models and decoration patterns. The characteristic style of the products of the 1950s and 1960s is known today by the name of New Look. Designers associated with the Institute of Industrial Design, an institution which exerted a great influence on the utilitarian art of the period of the Polish People’s Republic, cooperated with the Bogucice plant. It operated until 1993. Among its products, examples of historicizing and modern forms can be found.

The mocha cup and saucer. (1952/1993) by "Bogucice” Porcelain PlantThe Museum of Katowice History

"Justyna" - designed by Alojzy Kosowski. White porcelain, cobalt and gold - a classic combination.

The mocha cup and saucer. (1960/1969) by "Bogucice” Porcelain PlantThe Museum of Katowice History

The white coffee cup with saucer from Epos set. (1968) by "Bogucice” Porcelain PlantThe Museum of Katowice History

"Epos" – designed by Eryka Trzewik-Drost, decoration made by means of spraying

The white coffee cup with saucer from Luna set. (1966/1972) by "Bogucice” Porcelain PlantThe Museum of Katowice History

"Luna" – designed by Eryka Eryki Trzewik-Drost, in the style presently known as New Look

Decoration made by means of spraying and scratching technique

The mocha cup and saucer from Syrena set. (1970/1979) by "Bogucice” Porcelain PlantThe Museum of Katowice History

signature Steatyt (1953/1994)The Museum of Katowice History

”Steatyt”
Ceramic Products Factory

The Katowice Ceramic Products Factory ”Steatyt” was established in 1947. It was a private company founded by Zygmunt Buksowicz. Initially, it produced electrotechnical porcelain, later the production of coffee and tea sets as well as various bric-a-brac in the form of figurines, vases, ashtrays and jewellery was initiated. Fanciful designs and lustrous colors became the hallmark of products by ”Steatyt” which ended its production in 1994.

The original forms of cups, saucers and plates are emphasized by vivid colours and the whole decoration is complemented by ample gilding. 

Breakfest set (1960/1969) by Ceramic Products Factory ”Steatyt”The Museum of Katowice History

Fanciful shapes, colours and gold – the hallmarks of „Steatyt” factory

The mocha cup and saucer from Kalipso set. (1960/1969) by Ceramic Products Factory ”Steatyt”The Museum of Katowice History

Vessels belonging to "Kalipso" mocha set

The mocha cup and saucer. (1960/1969) by Ceramic Products Factory ”Steatyt”The Museum of Katowice History

The mocha cup and saucer. (1960/1969) by Ceramic Products Factory ”Steatyt”The Museum of Katowice History

Handpaited porcelain with fishs motives.

The teacup and saucer. (1960/1969) by Ceramic Products Factory ”Steatyt”The Museum of Katowice History

Credits: Story

Curator: Magdalena Niziołek
Photographers: Arkadiusz Ławyrywianiec, Michał Szalast, S3D
Translator: Monika Hartman
Project Coordinator: Magdalena Niziołek

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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