A Journey Through the Human Body

Discover how the human body works inside

By Parque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Travel to the Human Body" Pavilion (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Journey Through the Human Body Pavillion

Be immersed in this exciting journey and learn about human beings, from their inner workings to their relationship with other living creatures. Compare our anatomy to that of other vertebrates—it is surprising how much we have in common.

Evolution and Equilibrium

If 4.5 million years of evolution were condensed into a 24-hour day, homo sapiens wouldn't appear until just a few seconds before midnight. Do you want to know more about the origins of life and our ancestors?

Evolution and balance (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Did you know…?

It is not the size of our skulls that make us more or less intelligent than other animals, but the volume of the brain and its convolutions.

Our Protective Barrier: The Skin

Our thinnest layer of skin measures less than 0.04 of an inch: it's your eyelids! Your thickest layer of skin is usually the soles of your feet. Throughout your body, features such as the thickness, color, and texture of your skin change.

Life in perfect balance: Ecosphere (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Life in Perfect Balance: Ecosphere

The Ecosphere is a small ecosystem in a hermetically sealed container, where the only external input is light. Three very different organisms live together in forced cooperation: decomposers (bacteria), producers (microalgae), and consumers.

The heat brings out the colours (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Heat Brings Out Your Colors

Thermal imaging is used to find information on the distribution of body heat or objects, based on infrared radiation emitted from our skin or the surface. If you stand in front of the camera, you will see your colors.

Did you know…?

Some vipers have a thermoreceptor cavity called a loreal pit located between their eyes and nostrils. They can sense the heat emitted by potential prey. There's no danger in hunting at night, right?

All Heart

Our bodies need oxygen, which is taken in by the respiratory system via the lungs and diaphragm. The heart is a hydraulic pump that distributes oxygen to all the body's cells.

5 litres of life (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

One Gallon of Life

Blood transports oxygen and nutrients through the arteries to all the cells in the body and carries carbon dioxide and waste products via the veins. It also transports our defenses, hormones, and other vital substances.

Plastinated heart (2012) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

You're All Heart

The right half of the human heart receives deoxygenated blood from cells and tissues and pumps it into the lungs. The left half receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and sends it to our cells and tissues. 

Whale heart (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Did you know…?

The human heart weighs approximately nine ounces and is capable of pumping one gallon of blood per minute. The heart of a whale like the one we have here measures 5 x 4 x 4 feet and weighs 400 pounds, and pumps 50 gallons of blood per minute.

We Are What We Eat

Is it possible to convert an apple into energy? That's exactly what our digestive system does. When we eat an apple, our digestive tract transforms it into nutrients. These are small molecules that pass into the blood to be transported to our cells. Is it magic? No, it's digestion.

Teeth and chewing (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Armed to the Teeth

They cut, tear, and shred… No, we are not talking about a ferocious industrial machine—we're talking about our teeth! The chewing done by our 32 teeth, with the help of saliva and our tongue, is the first stage of digestion.

Your weight in water (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Your Weight in Water

Water is life. Our cells need it to live, our blood needs it to flow, and our body needs it to regulate our temperature. On average, it accounts for 65% of our total body weight.

Birth: Formation and Growth

After fertilization comes the embryonic period (the first 56 days during which all the organs and individual adult structures are formed) and the fetal period (when it becomes a recognizable human and the structures will continue to mature until birth).

Fish and frogs in development aid (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Fish and Frogs Help Us Understand Fetal Development

The embryos of this tropical fish and frog are transparent, and so we can see how their organs form within a few hours. These animals are made of millions of cells that originate from just one (the fertilized egg), and can help us understand human development.

Training and growth (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Did you know…?

The gestation period in humans is about 40 weeks, not too long, for example, when compared with that of elephants which lasts 88 weeks, one of the longest in the animal kingdom.

The Nervous System

It collects information on our environment using our senses and it controls all the processes that occur within our body. You could say that it is the intelligence center that enables us to feel, remember, imagine, and create.

The nervous system (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

The More Wrinkled, the Better

How would you hold a sheet of paper in your hand? You'd crumple it up, right? This is exactly what happens to the cerebral cortex. The grooves and ridges of the cerebral cortex make up our "brain fingerprint."

To think or not to think, that is the question. (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

To Think or Not to Think, That Is the Question

Our brains emit electromagnetic waves: Alpha waves if we are relaxed and Beta waves if we are in a state of alert. They work almost like musical notes, capable of creating a balanced harmony when our thoughts and emotions are in sync.

Gallery of Curiosities

Before museums existed, Cabinets of Curiosities housed collections of animal, vegetable and mineral specimens. Here we can see some of the medical, zoological, and botanical collections from the 19th century. 

From a vertebra (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

From One Vertebra

We have taken a single lumbar vertebra from one of the vertebrates that you see here in our collection. Its anatomy is similar to ours, consisting of a bony mass with a hole, which houses and protects the spinal cord. You can also see some protrusions, which are used to pull the muscles that produce movement.

Laboratory (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Plastination Laboratory and Collections

In this laboratory, objects related to life sciences and health are described and inventoried, and collections are prepared and preserved using various techniques such as fluid preservation, dry preservation, freeze-drying, resin, Dawson's method, and plastination.

Human skeleton (2008) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Did you know...?

Vertebrae form the spinal column. During childhood we have 33 vertebrae (7 cervical + 12 thoracic + 5 lumbar + 5 sacral + 4 coccyx), while in adulthood the number decreases as the bones in the sacrum and coccyx begin to fuse.

Lyophilisation (2015) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Freeze-Drying

This is a preservation method carried out using a freeze-dryer. Frozen samples are vacuum-packed and dehydrated, converting frozen water into a gaseous state (sublimation). This process removes water, preventing microorganisms from growing.

Freeze-dried food (2021) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Did you know…?

Sachet soups and some fruit and vegetable snacks are sold freeze-dried. This allows them to retain their vitamins and nutrients for longer.  

Do you know the plastination? (2013) by Parque de las CienciasParque de las Ciencias Andalucía-Granada

Have you heard of plastination?

In the laboratory, organs and living things are preserved using a modern process called plastination. In this process, liquids and soluble fats are extracted using solvents and are then replaced with elastic polymers, such as silicone, polyester resin, or epoxy resin.

Credits: Story

Science Park, Granada

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