Mal Lawal 3: Caring for Heritage

Through their practice, collectors can find themselves preserving memory, creating learning opportunities and making art and culture accessible.

Mr. Salem Saeed Al Mohannadi's collection, car from Al Mohannadi's collection, (2020) by Salem Saeed Al MohannadiNational Museum of Qatar

Preserving memories

Collecting as a practice is often linked with the past. Collectors may collect to preserve personal memories, emotions or feelings. Collectors may also collect to document the collective past.

Mr. Salem Saeed Al Mohannadi's collection, view of Al Mohannadi's private museum, (2020) by Salem Saeed Al MohannadiNational Museum of Qatar

Salem Saeed Al Mohannadi

Salem S. Al Mohannadi began collecting classic cars in 1997. He is interested in the cars used by local and regional historical figures as they narrate pivotal moments in Qatar’s history. His 200 cars are on display in his museum. The oldest car he owns was made in 1908.

Mrs. Noora Mohammed Al Nassr's composition of children's toys, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Noora Mohammed Al Nassr

Noora M. Al Nassr began collecting from the age of seven. Over the last 15 years, her collection has grown to include objects related to Qatari heritage, such as tools and utensils. She also expanded her collection to include vintage toys as they evoke feelings of nostalgia.

Mr. Yousuf Al Kuwari's briefcase with objects, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Yousuf Abdulla Al Kuwari

Yousuf A. Al Kuwari began collecting banknotes and later expanded his collection to include Qatari heritage objects. He collects to understand the past and preserve national heritage.

Mr. Hussein Saad Hussein Muhammad Al Ajeel's collection, profile photo, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Hussain Saad Al Egail

When Hussain S. Al Egail was a child, he was fascinated by the different plates used to serve food in Qatari households during the holy month of Ramadan. 

Mr. Hussein Saad Hussein Muhammad Al Ajeel's collection, a selection of tableware from Al Ajeel's collection, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

These plates slowly started to disappear over the years, and in 2015, Al Egail decided to document and collect them.

Mr. Abdullah Shaheen Ghanem Al Ghanim Al Maadeed's collection, profile photo, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Abdulla Shaheen Al Maadeed

Inspired by his elder relatives, Abdulla S. Al Maadeed became passionate about Qatari and Gulf heritage from a young age. His first collection consisted of their gifts and featured around 60-70 unique items.

Mr. Abdullah Shaheen Ghanem Al Ghanim Al Maadeed's collection, a view of Al Maadeed's private museum, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar


He created a private museum in his home, located in Fareej Al Ghanim, in order to preserve Qatari heritage of the past and showcase Qatari heritage of the present. The museum houses more than 200 objects.

Mr. Mohammed Abdulla Sadiq's collection, composition of objects about the State of Qatar, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Collecting as a way of learning

Collecting is an opportunity to learn. It is hands on, experiential and performative. Through the assemblage of objects, collectors can identify narratives. These objects are a testimony to history and cultural practices and can also disseminate knowledge.

Mr. Hussain Rajab Al Ismail's collection, profile photo, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Hussain Rajab Al Ismail

Hussain R. Al Ismail is a member of the Youth Hobbies Center's executive committee and the head of the center's Stamps and Coins Department. He collects stamps and coins in order to learn about the past whilst documenting history. 

Mr. Hussain Rajab Al Ismail's collection, stamps, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Initially, his interest in collecting stamps focused on large format stamps. His hobby transformed into a professional practice after being exposed to professional collectors during his studies in the US.

Mr. Mohammed Abdulla Sadiq's collection, Mr. Mohammed Abdulla Sadiq's collection, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Mohammed Abdulla Sadiq

Mohammed A. Sadiq collects documents related to the history of Qatar. By collecting newspapers, books, manuscripts and other types of publications, he is able to learn about the country’s history. 

Mr. Mohammed Abdulla Sadiq's collection, composition of objects about the State of Qatar, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Sadiq used his collection to author research papers and books.

Saif Ahmed Al Amri's collection, profile photo, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Saif Ahmed Al Amri

Saif Ahmed Al Amri is fascinated by old cities in Arabia. He began collecting coins, maps, and images to learn more on the topic.

Saif Ahmed Al Amri's collection, closeup of Al Amri's coin collection, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

For him, coins and maps are not only a record of the different Islamic eras, but also a documentation of the various rulers and their leadership styles.

Mr. Mohammed Abdulla Al Jabir's collection, profile photo, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Mohammed Abdulla Al Jabir

Inspired by the collection of the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Mohammed A. Al Jabir started his own collection of Islamic art. 

Mr. Mohammed Abdulla Al Jabir's collection, composition of objects related to Islamic metalwork, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

This interest pushed him into deepening his knowledge on the topic, which in turn, helped him become a more selective collector.

Mr. Ahmed Abdullah Musleh Ali Al Fahad's collection, profile photo, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Ahmed Abdulla Al Fahad

Ahmed A. Al Fahad began collecting antiques and coins as a hobby. Inspired by the community of collectors he was surrounded by, he developed this interest further. 

Mr. Ahmed Abdullah Musleh Ali Al Fahad's collection, coins and medallions, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

He began learning about his possessions by researching them closely and eventually applied his knowledge to evolve his collecting practice, but also to assist new collectors. 

Mr. Abdulla Al Mohannadi's collection, Mr. Abdulla Lahdan Al Mohannadi stands outside his private museum, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Sense of responsibility

At times, collectors feel responsible for documenting, preserving, and making accessible art and culture to the public. They can also support the local community. Through their collecting practices, they can be cultural instigators and active voices of the community.

Mr. Tariq Mohammed Al Jaidah's collection, profile photo, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Tariq Mohammed Al Jaidah

Tariq M. Al Jaidah’s collection of contemporary art from the Middle East is his way of providing an alternative voice for artists — fluid and organic approaches not limited by institutional practices and structures.

Mr. Tariq Mohammed Al Jaidah's collection, composition of objects related to Islamic calligraphy, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

He established the Souq Waqif Center and the Katara Art Center, two independent spaces to promote arts and culture.

Mr. Abdulla Al Mohannadi's collection, profile photo, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Abdulla Lahdan Al Mohannadi

Abdulla L. Al Mohannadi is a researcher of Qatari and Gulf heritage. His collection, consisting of crafts, furniture, appliances, ornaments, clothing, books and documents, is housed in his own private museum which itself reflects the traditional Qatari architectural style.

Mr. Abdulla Al Mohannadi's collection, commonly found and used objects in a Qatari Majlis at Mr. Abdulla Al Mohannadi's private museum, (2020) by Sixty DegreesNational Museum of Qatar

Al Mohannadi collects and displays his collections, because he feels a sense of responsibility in documenting and preserving heritage.

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