TOWARDS THE 1970 WORLD CUP

From São Paulo to Mexico in a Volkswagen Beetle

By The Football Museum

Pôster Copa de 1970 (1970) by Acervo Marco Antonio LopesThe Football Museum

The expectation for the 1970 World Cup was high: three teams were already two-time champions and the dispute to stay definitively with the Jules Rimet cup had everything to be fierce. Brazil was on par with Uruguay and Italy, with a team of excellent players.

Fael friends and Ivan. (1970) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

Two friends from São Paulo decided to go to the party at any cost, avoiding the lack of money with a drastic decision: they would make the trip to Mexico in a Beetle.

This exhibition tells the story of Ivan Charoux and Fael Sawaya - a story of friendship, passion for football and a testimony to the recent history of Latin America.

Towards the 1970 World Cup - Part 1. (2014) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

The trip started on May 12, 1970 in São Paulo, just 19 days before the opening of the World Cup. It would be more than 11 thousand kilometers by land and sea. They had little time, few resources, a Super 8 camera and, of course, their most faithful companion: the Beetle.

By Walter SandersLIFE Photo Collection

The people's car

It is difficult to imagine Latin American cities from the 1950s without the small round-line car. Light, compact and inexpensive, the Volkswagen Sedan has boosted the automotive industry in many countries in the region, including Brazil. But the model's history begins much earlier, in Germany.

Hitler/Jaeger File (1939-04-20) by Hugo JaegerLIFE Photo Collection

The Beetle project was developed by the self-taught engineer Ferdinand Porsche at the request of Adolf Hitler. The nazi dictator wanted a German car to compete with the American Ford T. Porsche started designing it in 1934.

Hitler/Jaeger File (1938-06-25) by Hugo JaegerLIFE Photo Collection

In 1938, Hitler participated in launch of the cornerstone of the factory in Fallersleben.

Hitler wanted the model to be called KDF Wagen - Kraft durch Freude, or "strength through joy". The name didn't stick, and soon it changed to the much simpler Volskwagen - the “people's car”, which would also name the factory and the brand.

Beetles plant in São Bernardo do Campo. by Fundo Correio da ManhãThe Football Museum

In Brazil, the first batch of 30 Beetles arrived at the Port of Santos in 1950. National production only started in 1958, at the blue print built in São Bernardo do Campo. Almost half of the components came from outside the country. In 1962, the manufacture incorporated Brazilian chassis - and this was precisely the model used by Fael and Ivan in their adventure to Mexico.

Hannu Mikkola and Gunnar Palm in Rally World Cup. (1970-06-14) by PA ImagesThe Football Museum

Crazy race

The idea of ​​driving to Mexico was not an accident. At the same time, the English newspaper Daily Mirror promoted the World Cup Rally, announced as the longest race in the world: over 26,000 km in 39 days, starting at Wembley stadium in London - home to the 1966 World Cup - to the Azteca Stadium in Mexico City. The race was started on April 19 by Sir Alf Ramsey, English national football coach.

Jimmy Greaves next to his Ford Escort. (1970-04-27) by Hulton ArchiveThe Football Museum

Spurred on by a £ 40,000 prize and the chance of world fame, 96 teams signed up. One of them headed by former english captain Jimmy Greaves with a Ford Escort. Still at the height of his football career, he was not called up for the english national team at the 1970 World Cup and decided to try another sport.

Alice Watson, Ginette Derolland and Rosemary Smith in Rally World Cup. (1970-04-03) by Hulton ArchiveThe Football Museum

Female doubles also participated in the competition. Among them the team of Irish Rosemary Smith, with an Austin Maxi.
While female emancipation was gaining ground in the world, in Brazil women would remain prohibited by law from playing football until 1979.

Rally World Cup. (1970-04-26) by MirrorpixThe Football Museum

The first stage covered 11 European countries and ended in Lisbon, Portugal, where the competitors embarked by ship to Rio de Janeiro. The second would begin on May 8, in front of the Hotel Glória. Of the 96 cars that left Wembley, only 71 completed the European stage.

attention on Rally - Part 2., Diário de Noticias, 1970-05-03, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Mexico World Cup Rally., Diário de Noticias, 1970-05-04, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Mexico's World Rally was started at Wembley., Diário de Noticias, 1970-05-04, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Map outline of Central and South America., O Estado de São Paulo, 1970-05-08, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Beetle Ivan and Fael in Foz do Iguaçu. (2014) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

With the great repercussion that the Rally had been having, Ivan and Fael saw the opportunity that they needed to accelerate their own trip: they dressed up the whole Beetle as if they were also competitors. The name of the fictional team: "Filhos da Pista", with the number 15. To guide them, common road route maps.

Coast of Peru and Ecuador., Rights Reserved, 1969-10, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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West Coast of South America., Rights Reserved, 1969-10, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Central America., Rights Reserved, 1969-10, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Aerial view of the Azteca Stadium., Rights Reserved, 1969-10, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Tourist map of Mexico., Rights Reserved, 1966, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Ivan passport - Part 2. (1970) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

It worked. Until Guayaquil, in Ecuador, they stayed ahead of the Rally, covering 1,500 km a day with the advantage of using the paved roads. When they were entering Bolivia, they heard on the AM radio: “...y llega el rally y siempre hay un Volkswagen adelante” - they were already being confused with the competitors! The stamps on passports show the crossing of borders at an accelerated pace.

Children work in clay pit. (1970-08-10) by Hulton ArchiveThe Football Museum

A region of inequality

Traveling on Latin American roads showed the pair a little of the continent's ills. Still in the southern cone, friends witnessed workers on the side of the road taking a whip from a overseer. Situations like that led the Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano to write, in this same period, “The open veins of Latin America”, a long essay on denouncing the effects of imperialist exploitation.

Lima quake. (1970-05-31) by Gamma-KeystoneThe Football Museum

Ivan and Fael passed through Peru days before the great earthquake of May 31, 1970 - the same day as the opening of the Mexico World Cup. 67,000 people died across the country, causing national commotion.

The Peruvian team would play its first game in two days, after 40 years without playing a world cup. Even shaken, the team had a great World Cup, under the command of Brazilian coach Didi.

Passage of Amalthé ship., Rights Reserved, 1970, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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In Guayaquil, Ecuador, the two friends tried to board the Beetle to Panama on the ship that was reserved for the rally, without success. They had to wait two days to dispatch it on another vessel. Then they became friends with french sailors and hitched a ride on the Almathée steamboat, which was carrying a shipment of bananas to the United States.

Ivan and Fael in Ecuador., Rights Reserved, 1970, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Amalthé ship., Rights Reserved, 1970, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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By Cornell CapaLIFE Photo Collection

Several of the countries in the region produced fruit for export in large estates owned by American companies, exploiting cheap labor. Eduardo Galeano made a long criticism about the inequalities promoted by this dynamic - but not only him. In the novel “One hundred years of solitude”, Gabriel García Márquez transformed into fiction a true episode that became known as “Massacre das Bananeiras”: in 1928, an unknown number of workers was killed by the Colombian army during a strike for better job conditions.

Ivan and Fael disembark after crossing on ferry. (1970) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

It wasn't just Ivan and Fael who had a passport. To travel through so many countries, the Beetle also had its own travel documents. In this video, from the return trip, it disembarks from the ferry that brought it from Panama to Ecuador.

Transportation of the Beetle. (1970-05-23) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

International Certificate for Beetle Car Ivan and Fael., Rights Reserved, 1970-05-08, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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international movement document the Beetle Ivan and Fael., Rights Reserved, 1970-05-09, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Beetle Document Ivan and FAEL., Rights Reserved, 1970-05-10, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Head between Honduras and El Salvador. (1969-07-16) by Correio da ManhãThe Football Museum

There was a war on the way

Before arriving in Guadalajara, Ivan and Fael lived the tense situation of the trip on the border between Honduras and El Salvador. At night of May 31, while stamping passports, they heard a shooting and ran back to the road so that the situation has calmed down.

Without knowing it, they suffered the echoes of a conflict between the two countries that peaked in the previous year, in 1969, in what remained known as “The War of Football”, or “The War of 100 hours”.

El Salvador's army advances on Honduras. (1969-07-15) by La Prensa GraficaThe Football Museum

Both countries were experiencing a long period of political tension caused by structural reasons that included land and migration issues. El Salvador was one of the most industrialized countries in Central America, but also one of the most densely populated; Honduras, in turn, had a mostly agricultural economy and was the third largest banana producer in the world. Many Salvadorans illegally emigrated to Honduras in search of land, and the country responded by persecuting immigrants.

Troops of Honduras in "War of the 100 hours." (1969-07-15) by AP PhotoThe Football Museum

Tensions peaked in 1969 during qualifying for the Mexico World Cup. The three matches between the national teams of Honduras and El Salvador were marked by violence outside the field, with persecutions and murders. El Salvador secured the spot for the competition and, two weeks later, bombed several cities in the neighboring country, including facilities in the Honduran air force in the capital Tegucigalpa. The ceasefire came only after intervention by the Organization of American States (OAS).

Football worries increasing number of people - part 3. (1969-07-13) by Correio da ManhãThe Football Museum

Soccer War, also known as the War of the 100 hours. (1969-07-16) by Correio da ManhãThe Football Museum

Used by the press to attract attention at the beginning of the conflict, the term “Football War” soon became problematized when the bombings became serious.

Mexican motorcade celebrating Brazil's victory. (1968) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

Finally, Mexico

Almost non-stop, Ivan and Fael arrived in time to see the first game of the Brazilian team against Czechoslovakia, on June 3, at the Jalisco stadium.

Towards the 1970 World Cup - Part 2. (2014) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

With the Mexican team playing only in Mexico City, Guadalajara has adopted Brazil as the team of the heart. The streets were green and yellow. At the end of the games, it was common for spontaneous car parede to form on the streets of the city, behind the Beetle.

Ticket for the match between Brazil and Czechoslovakia by the second round. (1970-06-03) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

The two friends only had tickets for the first game of the Brazilian team, but they won invitations to the other games from the Mexicans. That was how they managed to see the final against Italy at the Azteca stadium in Mexico City, and were able to witness the historic achievement of the third championship.

Back of the ticket to play Brazil in the second round., Rights Reserved, 1970-06-04, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Ticket to the World Cup final in Mexico., Rights Reserved, 1970-06-21, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Back of the ticket to the World Cup final in Mexico., Rights Reserved, 1970-06-22, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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According Jairzinho's goal. (2014) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

Several game excerpts were recorded with his Super 8 camera, including one of Jairzinho's goals in the national team's debut against Czechoslovakia.

Maluf presents the world with three-time champions Beetles. (1970-07-03) by José PintoThe Football Museum

A gift for three-time champions

On their return to Brazil, the city of São Paulo presented the players with a 0 km Beetle for each three-time champion and a bouquet of red roses in the trunk. Another example of how the model marked the time, the pleasure also shows how athletes
were still far from receiving millionaire salaries, even though they were the best
players on the planet.

For many, that was the first car of their lives, as in the case of Jairzinho. The gift paid for with public money yielded a 36-year lawsuit against then mayor Paulo Maluf. In 2006, the Federal Supreme Court considered the Law that authorized it to make the expense constitutional.

Motoradio homage to Brazilian three-time champions. (1970-07-21) by O Estado de São PauloThe Football Museum

Everyone wanted to hitch a ride on the success of the three-time champions - even the radio maker featured along with the Beetles.

Ivan and Fael the way to Alaska. (1970) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

The history of the Beetle continues

Do you think the adventure ended after the Tri? Not even. Fael and Ivan headed north to Alaska, crossing the United States and Canada, before returning to Brazil. Altogether, there were eight months of travel, more than 63 thousand kilometers traveled and 16 countries visited with the Beetle.

Fire in the Volkswagen plant. (1970-12-18) by Fundo Correio da ManhãThe Football Museum

Back to Brazil, Ivan and Fael had plans to take their brave beetle to the Volkswagen factory in São Bernardo do Campo, to celebrate the feat together with the manufacturer. But the blue print suffered a major fire on December 18, leaving the wing where the vehicles were painted completely destroyed. The factory was quickly recovered.

New cars on the assembly line of Volkswagen., O Estado de São Paulo, 1970-01-11, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Despite this setback, the model continued its success story for almost three decades. Since the beginning of production, the Beetle has been the sales leader in Brazil for 24 consecutive years. Between 1959 and 1996, more than three million Beetles were sold in the national territory.

Last Beetle assembled in Mexico. (2003-07-30) by Andrew Winning, poolThe Football Museum

The Beetle united Brazil to Mexico as much as the 1970 World Cup. There, the car also gained a nickname - Vocho - and was also a best seller. Mexico was the last country in the world to end production of the model. In 2003, the last Vocho to leave the assembly line deserved a farewell party animated by mariachis.

Team of "Filhos da Pista". (2014) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

From the third championship to the screens

Ivan and Fael's adventure continues to pay off. In 2014, they remade the trip to Mexico with a replica of the original Beetle for the documentary “Filhos da Pista”, directed by the mexican León Serment and produced by Cassio Pardini and Claudio Cao Quintas. The story of this incredible friendship will also be immortalized on the big screen.

Beetle-63 Playback used to redo the trip to Mexico., Rights Reserved, 2014, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Ivan and Fael retrace the route to Mexico., Rights Reserved, 2014, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Fael and Ivan in Salar de Uyuni., Rights Reserved, 2014, From the collection of: The Football Museum
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Fael and Ivan on the road. (2014) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

Ivan and Fael return to Estadio Jalisco. (2014) by Rights ReservedThe Football Museum

In memory of Fael Sewaya (left), director Leon Serment and producer Adriana Rosique.

Credits: Story

MUSEU DO FUTEBOL
GOVERNO DO ESTADO DE SÃO PAULO
JOÃO DORIA - Governador do Estado
RODRIGO GARCIA - Vice-Governador do Estado
SÉRGIO SÁ LEITÃO - Secretário de Cultura e Economia Criativa
CLÁUDIA PEDROZO - Secretária Executiva de Cultura e Economia Criativa
FREDERICO MASCARENHAS - Chefe de Gabinete de Cultura e Economia Criativa

IDBRASIL CULTURA, EDUCAÇÃO E ESPORTE - Organização Social de Cultura gestora do Museu do Futebol
Conselho de Administração
Presidente – Carlos Antonio Luque
Diretora Executiva e Administrativa e Financeira - Vitoria Boldrin
Diretora Técnica - Marilia Bonas (interina)

EXPOSIÇÃO RUMO À COPA DE 70
Curadoria e textos: Renata Beltrão
Pesquisa e colaboração geral: Ligia Dona, Dóris Régis, Camila Aderaldo, Ademir Takara
Montagem: Renata Beltrão
Revisão: Daniela Alfonsi
Tradução: Juliana Pons
Tratamento de imagens: Hugo Takeyama e Lucas Guedes

Crédito das imagens em movimento: Cenas extraídas do filme “Filhos da Pista”, dirigido por León Serment; Produção Latina Estudio, Nation Filmes e Taller de Luz

Agradecimentos a Cássio Pardini, Ivan Charoux e Rafael Sewaya (in memorian) e familiares, e à
Toriba Volkswagen pelo patrocínio que viabilizou esta exposição, por meio da Lei Federal de Incentivo à Cultura.

São Paulo, setembro de 2020.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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