Angles and Excitement

Striking sport venues

By Google Arts & Culture

Japan National Stadium (2019-11-23/2019-11-23) by Sergio Yoneda

Sportsmanship could not find two better venues than the Yoyogi National Gymnasium and the Japan National Stadium. Both are examples of modern Japanese architecture combined with traditional materials and shapes that recall the classic pagodas and a sublime aesthetic.

Loading

Japan National Stadium

Japan National Stadium

Designed by Kengo Kuma, its structure is characterized by the fluidity of its lines of wood and steel and the inclination that allows great unobstructed views.

The stadium is a large oval with a main structure made of reinforced concrete and steel, sheltered by a steel roof covered with wood.

The roof has a huge oculus that keeps out the sunlight and rain while permitting the air to circulate. It also has solar panels and rainwater collection points to irrigate the greenery.

Did you know that the Japan National Stadium has space for 500 wheelchairs? Its seating is evenly distributed over all levels, allowing those in wheelchairs to watch the competition from their preferred position.

Japan National Stadium (2019-11-23/2019-11-23) by Sergio Yoneda

The combination of construction materials has been novel and stresses the sustainability of both constructions. Finally, the ceilings honor the oriental tradition of emphasizing this part of the building, which is exciting from every angle.

Japan National Stadium (2019-10-05/2019-10-05) by Sergio Yoneda

The Japan National Stadium was inaugurated in November 2020, and the project was completed on schedule in 36 months.

Kuma’s design is based on the 1,300-year-old Gojunoto Pagoda at Horyuji temple in Nara Prefecture, the world’s oldest timber structure. 

Beneath the stadium’s natural grass pitch lies a system that controls the ground temperature, ensuring optimal growing conditions all year.

Loading

Yoyogi Gym

Yoyogi National Gymnasium

The Yoyogi National Gymnasium sits on the sprawling Yoyogi Park, very close to the Meiji Shrine in central Tokyo.

It was designed by Kenzo Tange for the 1964 Olympic Games and today is a venue for hockey, basketball, and soccer matches, as well as iconic New Year’s concerts. It is among the most beautiful sports venues of the 20th century because of its simplicity.

It is regarded as Tange’s masterpiece because of the amazing roof structure that looks like it is suspended in the air. Its dynamic and unique shape evokes an awning in the desert or a traditional pagoda.

Did you know that American architect James Lambiasi has described Yoyogi as the “pinnacle of modern architecture”?

Yoyogi National Gymnasium (2017-07-17/2017-07-17) by Mizoula

The aesthetics of these two stadiums is a sample of modern Japanese architecture. In both of them, it is evident that their creators were guided by a design principle of simplicity that allowed them to reach exquisite beauty.

Yoyogi National Gymnasia, Tokyo, Photographer: John Barr, Architect: Kenzō Tange (1913-2005), 2012, From the collection of: Royal Institute of British Architects
,
Yoyogi National Gymnasia, Tokyo, Photographer: John Barr, Architect: Kenzō Tange (1913-2005), 2012, From the collection of: Royal Institute of British Architects
,
Yoyogi National Gymnasia, Tokyo, Photographer: John Barr, Architect: Kenzō Tange (1913-2005), 2012, From the collection of: Royal Institute of British Architects
Show lessRead more

Yoyogi National Gymnasium (2017-07-18/2017-07-18) by Mizoula

The Yoyogi National Gymnasium was inaugurated in 1964 and its construction was completed in 18 months.

The architect Kenzo Tange used a suspension roof structure in which the roof was suspended by wire ropes, a method of construction never seen before in the world.

Yoyogi was the swimming venue in the 1964 Olympics where American teenager Don Shcollander won four gold medals.

Japan National Stadium (2019-11-23/2019-11-23) by Sergio Yoneda

The design and construction of the Yoyogi National Gymnasium and the Japan National Stadium have been a cornerstone of modern Japanese architecture. Two jewels, internationally recognized, that show their beauty and functionality from any angle.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
Explore more
Related theme
3D Models
null
View theme
Google apps