Journey to the Alcarria: Stage 5

The stretch between Trillo and Budia on a journey that combines literature and life.

By Diputación Provincial de Guadalajara

Diputación Provincial de Guadalajara

Journey to the Alcarria. Text for the fifth leg (1948) by Camilo José CelaDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

The following illustrative passage is from the fifth stage of the book "Journey to the Alcarria," in this project that combines literature and life: "As they come out on the stretch of land called the Fuente de la Galinda, the Tetas de Viana suddenly thrust themselves into view."

Map for the fifth leg: Trillo - Budia (1916) by Fernando Toquero y Laura DomínguezDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

The fifth stretch of the Journey to the Alcarria runs from Trillo to Budia, covering a total of just under 21 miles, of which around 6 were traveled in a vehicle and the remaining 14 or so on foot.

Halfway along this stretch, near Viana de Mondéjar, are the twin mountains known as the Tetas de Viana. The one that can be climbed is 3,753 feet high.

Breakfast in Trillo (2018) by Enrique DelgadoDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

Alcarrian honey is famous around the world. In the last century, it was common to see Alcarrian honey-sellers in Madrid walking around offering their products and shouting, "Honey-seller, plenty of honey! Alcarrian honey!"

It's a good way to start the day.

View from Trillo (2014) by Laura DomínguezDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"The Tagus meanders and can be seen from far away, completely surrounded by trees."

Journey to the Alcarria
Camilo José Cela

This is the view when leaving Trillo, looking towards Viana de Mondéjar across the Dehesa hill.

Flora in the Alcarria (2014) by Laura DomínguezDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

In "Journey to the Alcarria," Cela wrote: "On La Dehesa the herbage is harsh and fragrant, composed of hawthorn, rosemary, lavender, sage, marjoram, broom, gorse, spurge flax, spike, rockrose, dwarf oak, and thyme. You can scarcely see it but you get dizzy smelling it."

And on the road from Trillo to the Tetas de Viana twin mountains, that is exactly how it feels.

View: Tetas de Viana (2018) by Salva CalvoDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"The two Tetas are almost exactly alike seen from the north, with the more westerly one a little higher perhaps."

Journey to the Alcarria
Camilo José Cela

We urge travelers to see how the view changes as you walk around them.

Viana de Mondejar countryside (2014) by Laura DomínguezDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

The countryside surrounding the Tetas de Viana is typical of the Alcarria: it is close to a large city yet a world away.

Tetas de Viana and its flora (2014) by Laura DomínguezDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"Water's very treacherous, you know; sometimes you catch something you didn't have before.."

Journey to the Alcarria

Camilo José Cela

Passages like this show the popular wisdom of people who regularly walk in the countryside and have healthy habits.

Tetas de Viana summit (2014) by Laura DomínguezDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

Camilo José Cela did not reach the top of the Tetas de Viana on his first visit in 1946, or on his second in 1986. If you are physically fit, it is highly recommended.

Tetas de Viana summit (2018) by Salva CalvoDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

Only one of the Tetas de Viana can be climbed easily: the one that lies to the south. The recommended route is from Viana de Mondéjar as it is less steep than the approach from Trillo.

"The Tetas are much uglier seen from the south; they look ungainly, malformed, crooked, as it were."

Journey to the Alcarria
Camilo José Cela

Viana de Mondejar (2018) by Enrique DelgadoDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"Viana de Mondejar is a yellow-colored town laid out on a blunt blackish hill."

Journey to the Alcarria

Camilo José Cela

As well as being on the Journey to the Alcarria, this town is also part of the Camino de la Lana (Wool Route) of the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage.

Bridge of La Puerta (2014) by Enrique DelgadoDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"As far as La Puerta the road goes along the banks, or very close to the banks, of the stream; sometimes it wanders away and then garden plots begin to appear between the stream and the road."

Journey to the Alcarria

Camilo José Cela

This is how he describes his arrival at the bridge over the Solana River: a place to rest and cool off.

Commemorative Plaque of the Journey to the Alcarria by Enrique DelgadoDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"Camilo José Cela took a nap in this house on June 9, 1946. We are poor, as you can see, but nobody who has passed through La Puerta has left without some bread."

La Puerta landscape (2018) by Alfonso RomoDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"The Solana passes beneath it and then glides on between two great masses of rock in the shape of a saw, or better still, of a cock's comb."

Journey to the Alcarria
Camilo José Cela

The name of this rocky promontory is "Cerro de las Piedras" (Hill of Stones). It protects the town of La Puerta from strong westerly winds.

Local cuisine (2018) by Enrique DelgadoDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"The traveler pokes his nose into the kitchen. His pack is almost empty; only a hard-boiled egg and two oranges are left. The woman of the house offers him a few chunks of cooked goat's meat and a glass of milk, also goat's. The traveler thinks about Malta fever and then about the saying that the horn of hunger gores deepest of all..."

Journey to the Alcarria
Camilo José Cela

Entrepeñas reservoir (2018) by Fernando ToqueroDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

Camilo José Cela traveled around the Alcarria in 1946. The Entrepeñas reservoir was opened in 1956, which is why it does not appear in the book. It is located in the Alcarria Baja region of Guadalajara, on the Tagus River, and is also fed by other rivers, including the Valdetrigo, Barranco Grande, La Solana, and Empolveda.

Viaduct of the Entrepeñas reservoir (2018) by Fernando ToqueroDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

The viaduct over the Entrepeñas reservoir was built to enable Alcarria's modern-day road traffic to cross it.

Cela’s cell in Budia (2014) by Laura DomínguezDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"The room is almost hermetically closed; it is like a box, with no ventilation at all, not even a skylight, and the traveler doesn't wake up till ten in the morning."

Journey to the Alcarria

Camilo José Cela

There are several different opinions on whether Camilo José Cela slept in a prison cell in Budia. This account reflect the author's amusing re-telling of the event in his book. Today, 70 years later, the debate still rages on.

Fountain in the Plaza del Ayuntamiento of Budia (2016) by Fernando ToqueroDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"Eight or ten mules with no harness come trotting into the plaza, driven by a tall young man in a black blouse; they take a long drink in the trough..."

Journey to the Alcarria
Camilo José Cela

The fountain in the square at Budia is a refreshing welcome to the town.

Plaza del Ayuntamiento of Budia (2014) by Fernando ToqueroDiputación Provincial de Guadalajara

"Budia is a large town with old houses, and probably has had a splendid past."

Journey to the Alcarria
Camilo José Cela

As the writer rightly assumed, Budia has an interesting past. In 1434, it acquired the status of a town, although it must have been founded before the time of the Arab rule.

Credits: Story

Coordinators: Aurora Batanero, Mario G. Somoano, and Marcelino Ayuso (Department of Press and Tourism, Guadalajara Provincial Council)

Project producer: Guadalajara Provincial Council

Texts: Laura Domínguez and Fernando Toquero
Photography: Alfonso Romo, Enrique Delgado, Laura Domínguez, and Fernando Toquero.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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