Concrete and Cornflowers: Beech Gardens

Changing the Barbican's green spaces

John Trundle Court, Bunyan Court, Bryer Court: Sales Brochure - Page 1/14 by Corporation of London and Barbican Estate OfficeBarbican Centre

Beech Gardens

This booklet groups together three houses in the Barbican Estate which overlook the greenery of Beech Gardens. John Trundle Court, Bunyan Court and Bryan Court. Beech Gardens is next to the podium leading to Barbican station.

Beech Gardens

John Trundle House is named after a London printer (1575 - 1629)  who worked in the area.

Beech Gardens

John Bunyan  (1628-1688) was a preacher and the author of Pilgrim's Progress

Beech Gardens

and the Bryers were a nineteenth century family of silver and goldsmiths in the Barbican area.

Beech Gardens

This early illustration shows how Beech Gardens was designed when it was completed in 1972.

Beech Gardens, Barbican by James DeavinBarbican Centre

Award winning gardens

In 2015, they were reimagined with wildflowers by Professor Nigel Dunnett of Sheffield University.

Beech Gardens, Barbican by James DeavinBarbican Centre

Award winning gardens

In 2018, it won two awards from the Landscape Institute.

Recent view of the lake and Beech Gardens

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