Johann Joachim Kändler: 8 works

A slideshow of artworks auto-selected from multiple collections

By Google Arts & Culture

Dallying couple (Scaramouche and Columbine) (1740 - 1748) by Johann Joachim KändlerMuseum of Applied Arts, Budapest

'The model maker Johann Joachim Kandler (1706--1775) started work in Meissen in 1731. During his long career he made several thousand models for the factory and created a new style in porcelain sculpture.'

Parrot (1732) by Johann Joachim KaendlerPorcelain Collection, Dresden State Art Museums

'The Parrot climbing upside down on a tree trunk was represented by Johann Joachim Kaendler as if captured in a snapshot.'

King Vulture (1734) by Modeled by Johann Joachim Kandler; manufactured by Meissen Porcelain ManufactoryThe Art Institute of Chicago

'By 1733, the year the king died, more than thirty different models of birds and almost forty animals had been made, many by the sculptor Johann Joachim Kändler, who worked at Meissen from 1731 to 1775. Kändler drew this vulture from life, which allowed him to animate his work with the creature's quintessential spirit.'

Large tureen from the Swan service made for Count Heinrich von Brühl (1738) by Johann Joachim KaendlerPorcelain Collection, Dresden State Art Museums

'The modellers Johann Joachim Kaendler and Johann Gottfried Eberlein were commissioned with the design and the modelling.'

Bust of the court jester Gottfried Schmiedel (1739) by Johann Joachim KaendlerPorcelain Collection, Dresden State Art Museums

'One of the most successful likenesses by Kaendler is the bust of the "Kammer-Courier Junge", known as Baron Schmiedel, who alongside Joseph Fröhlich rose to fame as the second court jester of the Saxon electors in the Augustean period.'

Three Harlequins (1738 - 1740) by Johann Joachim KaendlerPorcelain Collection, Dresden State Art Museums

'The Harlequins of the commedia dell'arte with their histrionic gestures, exaggerated facial expressions and bizarre movements are very much in keeping with Joachim Kaendler`s predilection for dynamic sculptures.'

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'An entry dated 20th November 1745 in the workbook of Johann Kändler, the Meissen porcelain manufactory's chief modeler, describes the model for this piece: "A large Japanese group, with a pagod (man) seated on a green bank, next to him a Japanese woman who holds a sunshade over his head, close to him a parrot, which he feeds."'

Model of an equestrian statue for Augustus III (1753) by Johann Joachim KaendlerPorcelain Collection, Dresden State Art Museums

'In 1751 Kaendler received a commission to create a monumental equestrian statue of Augustus III in porcelain.'

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