Capturing the ceiling

Ultra-high resolution photography, explore the ceiling up close without leaving the ground

Royal Collection Trust, UK

An Allegory of Peace and the Arts (1635/1638) by Orazio GentileschiRoyal Collection Trust, UK

In 1638 Artemisia joined her father in London and it is said they worked together on the beautiful Triumph of the Peace and the Arts in the Queen's House, Greenwich.

Preparations for the photography (2019) by Rodney Todd White PhotographyRoyal Collection Trust, UK

Using gigapixel technology you can now explore each of the intricate figures and details of the painting in minute detail.

The ceiling being photographed (2019) by Rodney Todd White PhotographyRoyal Collection Trust, UK

The central figure of Peace is surrounded by twelve female figures representing different attributes of the arts. These were distant figures, now brought up close.

The camera capturing the ceiling (2019) by Rodney Todd White photographyRoyal Collection Trust, UK

To capture such a vast ceiling in fine detail took the team two days of photography, and hours of pre and post production.

An Allegory of Peace and the Arts (1635/1638) by Orazio GentileschiRoyal Collection Trust, UK

The shoot had to happen without any light pollution, so the team had to work overnight to prevent any sunlight affecting the lighting set up.

As well as allowing viewers access to the art in an entirely new, intimate way, the gigapixel imagery helps the curators and conservators monitor the painting's condition and preserve it for years to come.

The finest details of the figures now jump out, details you might struggle to see if you were standing on the ground.

Like this jug watering these plants, complete with a flow of translucent water splashing onto the leaves.

Or this snake and bunch of flowers, representing truth and deceit.

Or the intricate leaf and flower details of the frames.

Zoom in and explore this masterpiece.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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