Kilimanjaro National Park

UNESCO World Heritage

Vegetation zones The Giant Scenecio moorland zone (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

An outstanding example of an incredible natural phenomenon

Kilimanjaro National Park covering an area of some 75,575 ha protects the largest free standing volcanic mass in the world and the highest mountain in Africa, rising 4877m above surrounding plains to 5895m at its peak.

Vegetation zones Zonation of vegetation, the moorland, alpine desert and artic (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

With its snow-capped peak, the Kilimanjaro is a superlative natural phenomenon, standing in isolation above the surrounding plains overlooking the savannah. Mount Kilimanjaro is one of the largest volcanoes in the world. It has three main volcanic peaks, Kibo, Mawenzi and Shira.

Shira plateau (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

With its snow-capped peak and glaciers, it is the highest mountain in Africa. The mountain has five main vegetation zones from the lowest to the highest point: Lower slopes, montane forest, heath and moorland, alpine desert and summit. The whole mountain including the montane forest belt is very rich in species, in particular mammals, many of them endangered species.

The sun set at Londorosi gate (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

For this combination of features but mostly its height, its physical form and snow cap and its isolation above the surrounding plains, Mount Kilimanjaro is considered an outstanding example of a superlative natural phenomenon.

A view of mawenzi peak (5419m) from horombo huts (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

Mawenzi is the second highest peak on Mount Kilimanjaro at 5,149m, its rugged peak lies to the East of the Park.

Endemic Impatiens kilimanjari (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

The montane forest is one of the most important biological zones for the park. Located between 1800 and 2800m, approximately 69% of the bird species and 80% of large mammals are contained in this zone. It also contributes to an overall scenic beauty of the park. It is a water catchment area, which discharges its water to the lower land plains. The montane forest harbors rare and endemic flora for example the Impatience Kilimanjari.

Visitors on the rongai route enjoying their hike (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

Discovering Kilimanjaro National Park

Summiting uhuru peak (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

Climbing to Kibo peak takes from 5, 6, 7 or more days depending on the route and choice of the climber. The more days, higher the possibility to conquer to the summit of Kibo peak. An extra day in any station above 3000m above sea level during the climb is highly recommended for adequate acclimatization. Six mountain trails can take a climber to the mountain peak, each route offering different attractions and challenges.

Mountain cycling (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

Tourists have a chance to cycle inside the park. There are two routes which are used for cycling, one for summit bound visitors (Kilema route) and second one for non summit visitors (Shira plateau).

Paragliding Paragliding (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

Paragliders should feel at home on Mount Kilimanjaro when freeflying from the world’s highest free standing mountain. Tourists may use parachutes or wingsuits while undertaking this activity.

Horombo huts at 3720m along the marangu route (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

Kilimanjaro National Park is the highest point in Africa. It's also the world’s largest free standing volcanic mass.

Enjoying the magnificient view of the glacier at the summit (1987) by Kilimanjaro National ParkUNESCO World Heritage

It is located between 2o50” – 3o10”S and 37o00”- 37o43”E in Northern Tanzania. Kilimanjaro is comprised of two dormant [Kibo 5,895m a.m.s.l (average meters above sea level) and Mawenzi 5,149m a.m.s.l] and one extinct [Shira 3,962m a.m.s.l] volcanoes.

Credits: Story

This exhibit was created by Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA)
www.tanzaniaparks.go.tz/


More on the Kilimanjaro and World Heritage:
whc.unesco.org/en/list/403/

Photos: Abdul Leopard tours; Herman Baltazary Park Warden; Muhsin; David Maige Park Warden; Richard Mollel-Mountain guide; Hobokela Mwamjengwa (outreach warden)

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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