Public Art in Neighborhoods

Public art should acknowledge the space it inhabits and the surrounding community. - Shaun Cassidy, Charlotte-based artist

By Arts & Science Council

Now is Fireworks (2016) by Amy Bagwell and Graham CarewArts & Science Council

Elizabeth

A love poem to Charlotte’s Elizabeth neighborhood can be found in the trees that line the streets of the convivial community. 

Fence scenes best seen at an angle and more than 30 inventive “wordhouses” in city-maintained trees pull pedestrians through the neighborhood line by line.

Now is Fireworks (2016) by Amy Bagwell and Graham CarewArts & Science Council

Long after every romantic line is plucked from the branches, the poem’s title – “Now is Fireworks” – will remain as a reminder to live in the moment, etched in a stainless steel sculpture.

Now is Fireworks (2016) by Amy Bagwell and Graham CarewArts & Science Council

Students from Central Piedmont Community College printed the vinyl lenticular images of Carew’s colorful birds adhered to the metal fence by the water tower.

Origins by Laurel Holtzapple, Lauren Doran and CassidyArts & Science Council

Reid Park

“Origins,” “Community Spring” and “Life,” the three pieces that comprise the public art at the new Reid Park Neighborhood Park in Charlotte.

Origins by Laurel Holtzapple, Lauren Doran and CassidyArts & Science Council

“Origins,” a gateway artwork at the Reid Neighborhood Park entrance, honors the Reid Park neighborhood’s founding leaders Amay James and Ross Reid.

Community Spring (2015) by Laurel Holtzapple, Lauren Doran and CassidyArts & Science Council

“Community Spring,” made from three boulders, is inspired by the neighborhood’s spring, street patterns and quilting tradition.

Life . by Laurel Holtzapple, Lauren Doran and CassidyArts & Science Council

A young child climbs atop “Life,” a public artwork inspired by the okra plants found in the gardens of early Reid Park residents.

Sedgefield Totem (2016) by Paula SmithArts & Science Council

Sedgefield

Sedgefield residents wanted the artwork to be vertical and whimsical, with bright primary colors artist reminiscent of those found in many of the sculptures created by Niki de Saint Phalle.

Sedgefield Totem (2016) by Paula SmithArts & Science Council

The tree tiles reference the early families that farmed the land. Floral imagery references the first Charlotte Garden Club, which originated in Sedgefield.

Sedgefield Totem (2016) by Paula SmithArts & Science Council

“Selfie” tiles of animals, faces and object mementos were created at a neighborhood workshop that allowed residents to create clay tiles of imagery meaningful to them.

Sedgefield Totem (2016) by Paula SmithArts & Science Council

The 13-foot totem is topped with a stylized pineapple, a welcoming symbol signifying hospitality.

Embrace (2017) by Leslie Scott and Lee BaumgartenArts & Science Council

MoRa

"Embrace" by Leslie Scott and Lee Baumgarten provides a gathering spot for MoRa community members at the corner of Conference Drive and Monroe Road in Charlotte.

Embrace (2017) by Leslie Scott and Lee BaumgartenArts & Science Council

The custom tiles were crafted by local students and neighbors.

Embrace (2017) by Leslie Scott and Lee BaumgartenArts & Science Council

"Embrace" is a tribute to this community’s spirit, hard work and generosity, and a symbol of what we can do when we work together.

Embrace (2017) by Leslie Scott and Lee BaumgartenArts & Science Council

Ascension by Dana GingrasArts & Science Council

Grove Park

"Ascension", created by Dana Gingras, is both a subtle nod to the mining history of the Grove Park neighborhood and to the area’s forward progress.

Ascension by Dana GingrasArts & Science Council

A stunning corten steel and stainless steel sculpture.

Credits: Story

Much of the public art seen in this exhibit is part of the Neighborhoods in Creative pARTnership initiative launched by the City of Charlotte, the Public Art Commission and ASC to bring more neighborhood-based public art to the city.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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