Klimt's Studios

By Austrian National Library

Wien 8, Josefstädter Straße 21 (around 1910) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

The Studio on Josefstädter Straße (1892–1911)

From 1892–1911, Klimt worked in a ground floor, free-standing studio with access to a garden, which was situated in the backyard of a tenement building at no. 21 Josefstädterstraße in Vienna's eighth district.

Wien 8, Josefstädter Straße 21 (around 1910) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

The interior of this building is documented by one single photograph, which only shows a foyer to the actual work space.

Painting "Elisabeth Lederer" (1914-1916) by Gustav Klimt (after 1916) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

Klimt himself had an art collection that included numerous Orientalia, which served as inspiration for his work.

Wien 8, Josefstädter Straße 21 (around 1910) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

He used a skeleton as an object of study—a motif that often appeared in his works.

Death and Life (1910/15) by Gustav KlimtLeopold Museum

Gustav Klimt standing in his garden in front of his studio (1911-05) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

The studio was not just a creative workshop, but also a retreat.

Gustav Klimt (c. 1909) by Pauline HamiltonAustrian National Library

In his studio, Klimt preferred to wear his blue painter's smock.

Painter’s smock, Presumably based on a design by Gustav Klimt (c. 1905) by Gustav KlimtWien Museum

Gustav Klimt (c. 1910) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

Only models or invited guests, such as buyers, were allowed to enter his studio. Nobody was allowed to enter unannounced.

Gustav Klimt and Emilie Flöge (around 1909) by H. BöhlerAustrian National Library

His close friend Emilie Flöge often visited him in his studios.

Gustav Klimt in front of his studio in the Josefstädter Straße (c. 1910) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

In 1911, Klimt had to move out of his studio on Josefstädter Straße because the building was to be demolished.

Wien 13, Feldmühlgasse 11 (1918) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

The Studio on Feldmühlgasse (1911–18)

Klimt found a new studio at no. 11 Feldmühlgasse in Vienna's 13th district. It was a single-storey house that was part of a villa and was surrounded by a garden, which the artist had planted with flowers.

Wien 13, Feldmühlgasse 11 (1918) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

Klimt was able to show off his art collection in the new premises.

His Japanese woodcuts were effectively mounted on the walls in uniform dark frames.

Dark furniture was designed by Josef Hoffmann in the Wiener Werkstätte.

In a large cupboard were kept sketches, designs, and East Asian silk garments and fabrics, which Klimt liked to use as props for his models. The artist used the upper compartments of the cupboard for his books. Klimt is said to have owned a comprehensive library of books.

The patterned carpet was also designed by Josef Hoffmann in the Wiener Werkstätte and produced by Backhausen.

Gustav Klimt's studio at the Feldmühlgasse 11 (1918) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

Klimt appreciated the tranquility in Hietzing, far away from Vienna's loud city center. As he got older, he retreated for days at a time, and worked intensively on his artwork.

Gustav Klimt (c. 1910) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

Klimt was kept entertained by his many cats, which he kept in his studio.

Wien 13, Feldmühlgasse 11 (1918) by Moriz NährAustrian National Library

In 1923, the garden apartment was converted into a villa by the then owner. The studio rooms, however, have been preserved to this day.

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