The changing world:          the changing america

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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.

As the physical world was changing, the art world was changing as well. The art in this gallery shows this change through the depiction of people, exploration, the diminishing wilderness, and metaphors for moral, religious, or poetic sentiment. Viewers may interpret these paintings beyond their original meanings, which is the beauty of art. 

On the Beach, Thomas Doughty (1793-1856), 1827 - 1828, From the collection of: Albany Institute of History & Art
I like how the trees are painted so that they frame the subject of the painting: the people walking on the beach. The contrast among the trees, the people, and the beach emphasize the main subject.
Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, Thomas Cole, 1828, From the collection of: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Religion is a prominent theme in this artwork. The artwork makes me feel the fear of being cast into the unknown.
Views Across Frenchman's Bay from Mt. Desert Island, After a Squall, Thomas Cole (American, b.1801, d.1848), 1845, From the collection of: Cincinnati Art Museum
I like how this painting shows the approaching storm and waves crashing on the rocks. The storm and the waves make the painting seem more lifelike. This painting helps display the beauty of nature.
The First Harvest in the Wilderness, Asher B. Durand, 1855, From the collection of: Brooklyn Museum
This painting makes me feel hopeful. The light coming from the clouds represents the hopefulness that the people must have felt when they realized that they had a harvest.
Vision of the Cross, Frederic Edwin Church, after 1847, From the collection of: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
I like how I can still recognize the people and the cross despite the obvious and choppy brushstrokes. I can easily see the cross; it is brighter when compared to the darker colors of the painting
The Caves, Robert Seldon Duncanson, 1869, From the collection of: Amon Carter Museum of American Art
This painting reminds the people of the wilderness that is being lost to progress. While the painting is not overly bright, the painting makes me feel the mystery of the cave and the forest it is in.
Roman Fish Market. Arch of Octavius, Albert Bierstadt, 1858, From the collection of: de Young museum
While this painting shows society during the time of Rome, it also displays the truths of society today: poverty and unsanitary sections of a society.
The colors used are beautiful and accurately display a sunset. The colors of the sun dance on the ocean waves, and the waves seem pretty realistic. As the sun descends the rest of the sky gets darker.
The Coast of Genoa, Jasper Francis Cropsey, 1854, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
The painting shows the beauty of a place beyond America. I like how the mountains painted in the back implies that there is more beauty beyond the coast.
Victorian Bouquet, Severin Roesen, c. 1850 - 1855, From the collection of: The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
I like how the flowers contrast the black background, emphasizing the flowers and the champagne. I also like how not all of the flowers are one color nor are all the flowers are bright colors.
Order No. 11, George Caleb Bingham (American, b.1811, d.1879), 1865 - 1868, From the collection of: Cincinnati Art Museum
Order No. 11 was issued during the Civil War, which forced villagers out of their homes. The Confederates and Union are not identifiable: only the anguish of these people forced to leave their homes.
The Money Diggers, John Quidor, 1832, From the collection of: Brooklyn Museum
The painting is discouraging greed. The money diggers are in states of shock and one man is about to fall into the hole. The audience's attention is focused on the men's looks of shock and horror.
The light of the painting makes me think of purity and innocence. The painting seems to depict a wilderness undisturbed by industrialism. The lake is so clear it reflects the mountain.
The Low Lighthouse, North Shields, Robert Salmon, 1775–ca.1845, British, 1828, From the collection of: Yale Center for British Art
I like how the artist made the manmade objects with sharp angles. Because of this, everything found in nature is distinguishable because the nature is drawn smoother than the manmade objects.
Winter Scene in New Haven, Connecticut, George Henry Durrie, ca. 1858, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
This painting is reminiscent of simpler times where one could clearly see and enjoy the beauty that the winter brought. The white snow contrasts with the dark sky, where a sliver of light is shown.
Patty-Cake, Lilly Martin Spencer (American, b.1822, d.1902), Circa 1855, From the collection of: Cincinnati Art Museum
This painting makes me feel reminiscent for the childhood innocence that is lost in time. This innocence is displayed by painting the clothing on the baby white. The painting shows simpler times.
Wi-jún-jon, Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going To and Returning From Washington, George Catlin, 1837-1839, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
This painting displays the supposed contrast between the "uncivil" Native Americans and the "civil" Americans. The image is reminiscent of the Native American prejudice that the Americans had.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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