Color and Contrast of japan - Seth DaCosta

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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.

The theme of the gallery of which I have chosen to make is titled “Color and Contrast of Japan.” I’m basing my theme off of painted portraits of females and males throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s of Japan. I’ll be describing the different colors, contrast, and use of realism in the paintings. 

Portrait Of Okubo Toshimichi, Artist: Kobayashi Kiyochika, Publisher: Matsuki Heikichi, ca. 1878, From the collection of: Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
This is a portrait of Japanese statesman and samurai, Okubo Toshimichi. The colors included in this painting are orange, green, black, red, and white. The color harmony is complimentary, seeing that orange and green fall opposite of each other on the color wheel.
Portrait of Hikogoro Shimizu, Tadasu Endo, c.1880, From the collection of: Tottori Prefectural Museum
This is a portrait of a school director that goes by the name of Shimizu Hikogoro. The artist puts a lot of emphasis on the face. The texture of it looks very shiny. There is also a strong use of contrast in this artwork as well. The right side of his face is much lighter than the left and spots like under his chin.
Sewing Woman, Ryuzo Morioka, c.1910, From the collection of: Tottori Prefectural Museum
What's painted here is a portrait of a woman sewing garments in what looks like a bedroom. I see some repetition of flowers in this artwork, that being the flowers on the table and the flowers painted on the scroll and canvas on the walls. This painting also utilizes contrast in a good way. The light is coming from the left side of the room, while there is darkness and shade behind the lady.
Portrait of Koya Yoshio(Portrait of a Man Holding a Plant), KISHIDA, Ryusei, 1916, From the collection of: The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo
This is a portrait of a man holding a plant, while looking down at something. Ryusei Kishida uses contrast on his face as you can see light and dark spots all over possibly from the light, which you can see in his eye. I can also see movement used in this painting by looking at his fingers. There are painted in a position as if he is going to touch the plant with his left hand.
Self-portrait, Artist: Kohno Michisei, Sitter: Kohno Michisei, 1917, From the collection of: Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Seen here is a self portrait oil painting of Kohno Michisei. This painting utilizes contrast and very dark shades of colors. The way he painted himself makes it seem as if he is in a dark room. I can tell that the light is entering from the right side because the flower on the left is much darker and almost hidden compared to the right.
Portrait of Kawabata Masamitsu, KISHIDA, Ryusei, 1918, From the collection of: The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo
Here we have another portrait done by Ryusei Kishida. This painting includes the head and shoulders of a man wearing a hat and staring to the side. Kishida uses contrast excellently again. The light is shining on the left side, but the right is shaded and in some areas completely black.
Portrait of a maiko, dancing girl, Artist: Yamamura Koka, Publisher: S. Watanabe Color Print Co., 1920, From the collection of: Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
This is a portrait of a maiko, a performer of music and dance, staring down while dancing. This painting uses vibrant shades of red, blue, and pink to grab the attention of the viewer. I can also see the contrast, as the left side of her body is a shade brighter than the right.
Portrait of Western Lady, Kanji Maeta, c.1925, From the collection of: Tottori Prefectural Museum
This is a portrait of a european lady. Unlike some of the other portraits she stares directly at the viewer, although her body is turned a bit. Kanji Maeta uses contrast very well in this painting. It can be seen on the woman's skin, on places like her lower arm and under her chin, and in the background.
Portrait of Chin-Jung, YASUI, Sotaro, 1934, From the collection of: The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo
Here we have a oil painting portrait of a woman by Sotaro Yasui. This painting uses a triadic scheme of colors. Those colors being Blue, Pink, and Yellow. This artwork also utilizes contrast in a different way not seen in the previous paintings. Contrast in this painting can be seen on the right side of her face and her shadow behind her on that appears on the wall.
Portrait of a Woman, OKADA, Saburosuke, 1936, From the collection of: The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo
This is an oil painting portrait of a woman done by Saburosuke Okada. The woman in this painting is standing and staring sideways. Although she is standing sideways in front of what i think is a brown wall, contrast can still be seen by the shading on her back, arm, and under her chin.
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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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