Japanese women & culture

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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.

I believe that portrait is the best art pieces that accurately represent people from their time. This photos gallery includes portraits of Japanese women that represent Japanese culture during 1860-1890.

[Elderly Japanese Woman Farm Laborer], Kusakabe Kimbei, 1870s - 1890s, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
The framing and composition in this picture are a little bit off. They do not utilize the space in this picture. It looks like a candid picture, where photographer didn't take their time to compose the shot, but to portray Japan villager as the way it is.
[Two Japanese Women in Costume], Unknown, about 1870–1890, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
This picture was taken by the unknown photographer during early Meiji period. It's a simple black & white picture but what make it stand out is the color red that was painted over. The color red is the color of extreme, love and seduction, it compliment very well with the subject.
Two Japanese Women, Felice Beato, 1868, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
This is a Black & White portrait picture of two Japanese girls in kimono and was later painted over with colored pencil. Lighting,colored and tone are blended together very well. The color of the kimono represents the true pure color as the real kimono this picture can use as a reference of the kimono during 1890.
This is another black & white portrait that was painted over with the color pencil. This picture has the same component as the previous picture ( Two Japanese Women1868) But it the gesture and confidence that interest me. It shows that Japanese women can be aggressive sometime.
[Japanese Woman Playing a Koto], Unknown, 1865–1875, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
It's a wide shot of a Japanese woman playing a Koto, it shows that the Japanese also got influence from China since koto was made in china. This picture is well composed. There are light shining in from many directions it helps create depth of field and help separate the subject from the background.
A Japanese girl in a jurikisha, Shinichi Suzuki, about 1873 - 1883, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
The picture represents how Japanese people transport using Jinrikisha back in the day. The color red is colored over the picture it makes her the main subject of this picture, also, the umbrella helps separate her face from the background and make her facial figure stand out even more.
(Konkonchiki) Japanese Girl Playing Game, Kusakabe Kimbei, 1870s - 1890s, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
This is a group picture of Japanese women playing a game. The color is very vivid and cheerful. The shot is very well composed and display Japanese interior design and furniture quite well. What I don't like about this picture is it little to flat because the subject is too close to the wall.
Japanese Woman, Unidentified photographer, c. 1862, From the collection of: Albany Institute of History & Art
This is another portrait pictures of Japanese women, it look more organic than other most picture in the gallery. This picture represents what housewife usually dress in that time period. It's a very simple picture that showcase the Japanese beauty.
Woman in Winter Dress, Felice Beato, about 1868, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
This is a picture of Japanese women in the winter dress. II like the tone and overall color in this picture. It look very smooth and was shot with soft focus, It have a mix of a warm grain of the film and coolness of the weather. it somehow makes me feel relax.
This another Black & white portrait that was painted over with the color pencil. this picture shows that Japanese women value they looks and how ideal Japanese women should look like during that period. I love the contrast in this picture
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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