The Fabric Source: Recycled Materials

Global Fashion Agenda

Turning waste into fashion

Turning waste into fashion
The demand for ever-new products, especially clothing, is high and seemingly raising. But resources are limited and the amount of waste we produce through our behaviour increasing. One attempt to make the fashion industry more sustainable, is to use recycled materials to reduce useless waste. This includes recycling old and used textiles, or even the pre-consumer waste, meaning excess and waste that occurs during production.  
Recycled Polyester
Polyester is the most used fiber in the textile industry. Recycled polyester and nylon are produced from pre- or post-consumer- or pre- or post-industrial waste materials such as PET plastic bottles, apparel or nylon fishing nets; material that would otherwise have been sent to landfill or for incineration. It prevents the further extraction of oil, a non-renewable resource. Recycled polyester requires fewer processing stages, consumes less energy during the production process, resulting in a considerable reduction in carbon emissions compared with virgin polyester. 
Recycled Silk
Recycled silk is silk made from pre-consumer waste. Pre-consumer waste comes from any excess material created during the steps of material- and product manufacturing, e.g. selvage from weaving, fabric from factory cutting rooms, or excess production and unsold items that might normally be disposed of as waste. 
Recycled Wool
Recycled wool is wool made from pre-consumer or post-consumer waste. Pre-consumer waste comes from any excess material created during the steps of material- and product manufacturing, e.g. selvage from weaving, fabric from factory cutting rooms, or excess production and unsold items that might normally be disposed of as waste. Post-consumer waste comes from household resources, e.g. used apparel or home textile products. 
Recycled Cotton
Recycled cotton is cotton made from pre-consumer or post-consumer waste. Pre-consumer waste comes from any excess material created during the steps of material- and product manufacturing, e.g. selvage from weaving, fabric from factory cutting rooms, or excess production and unsold items that might normally be disposed of as waste. Post-consumer waste comes from household resources, e.g. used apparel or home textile products. 
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The Fabric Source
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Newlife
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