1912 - 1993

1913 Land act

Africa Media Online

The removal of "black spots"

The 1913 Land Act prohibited "black" people from buying or renting land in areas designated as "white".  This legislation was one of the cornerstones of apartheid and paved the way for further legislation restricting the rights of black people and their ownership of land.  

In order to fulfill this legislation the government took measures to forcibly remove black people from areas set aside for white people.

Home in Valspan, an area threatened by apartheid forced removals. The residents were not allowed to repair their homes, and only very basic services were provided. The Apartheid government then designated the area a 'slum'. The number on the door indicates that removal is immanent
Mr Cwaile, Valspan activist, outside his home. Valspan was an area threatened by apartheid forced removals. The residents were not allowed to repair their homes and only very basic services were provided. The apartheid government then designated the area a 'slum'. The number on the door indicates that removal is immanent.
Woman plastering walls with mud. Daggakraal was an area deemed a 'black spot' by the apartheid government and was threatened with forced removal. Maintaining the home was seen as resistance to removal.
Tinkie, a praise singer, with Jill, a member of Black Sash. Mathopiestad was a productive farming area deemed a 'black spot' by the apartheid Government and threatened by forced removal.
Sophiatown Removals - The Move - The first sixty families in Sophiatown, Johannesburg, have been given orders to leave their houses, and have been offered accomodation in the new location in Meadowlands. "You are hereby required in terms of the Native Resetlement Act 1954 to vacate the premises in which you are residing..."
Resistance to removals
Police watch squatters whose homes have been demolished.  Midrand: 1991
Loading up and moving
Toilets and thorn bushes. People who were forcibly removed by the apartheid government, were sometimes given tents. Toilets, however, were always available. The sight of rows of toilets in desolate areas would indicate immanent forced removals.
Buildings in Cape Town's District Six being demolished
Betty Nakona dumped with her possessions in a resettlement area. Botshabelo: 1987
Dumped! Beestekraal was a 'dumping ground' for those forcibly removed under the aparheid system. They were given tents and toilets. Farmworkers evicted from farms also were sent here.
Mrs Hlatswayo, building a new home in Driefontein. Driefontein was an area deemed a 'black spot' by the apartheid government. Farmworkers who were evicted from neighbouring white owned farms were given refuge in Driefontein. Mr Timothy Hlatswayo had been injured when the tractor driving farmworkers home, overturned. The farmer refused to accept responsibility for the accident, and evicted him from the farm.
Making the most of being forcibly removed. The resilient spirit of Africa.
Credits: Story

Photographer — Gille de Vlieg / South Photographs
Photographer — Paul Weinberg / South Photographs
Photographer — Paul Grendon / South Photographs
Photographer — Graeme Williams / South Photographs
Photographer — Cedric Nunn
Photographic Archive — Baileys African History Archive
Photographer — Paul Alberts / South Photographs
Photographer — Guy Tillim /  South Photographs

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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