Ludwig Meidner: 10 works

A slideshow of artworks auto-selected from multiple collections

By Google Arts & Culture

The Bomb (1914) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'With his "Krieg" (War) series, created 1914, Meidner became one of the first German painters to criticize the war in artistic terms. In this cycle, already Meidner showed the horrors of war while the overwhelming majority of Germans -- including most intellectuals and artists -- were still infected by a euphoric enthusiasm for the war.'

Despair (III) (1914) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'Meidner was most famous for his poignant depictions of death and destruction, his so-called apocalyptic landscapes.'

Street at Kreuzberg (1918) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'This print after a drawing from 1913 illustrates one of the main themes of Meidner's expressionist art: in dynamic scenes of big city life that reflected the hustle and bustle of the modern metropolis.'

Kneeling Figure (1918) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'During his military service as an interpreter in a POW camp from 1916 on, Meidner wrote the hymn-like prose poems that were later published in the collections "Im Nacken das Sternemeer" (The Sea of Stars at My Back) and "Septemberschrei" (September Cry).'

Ecstatic Figure (1918) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'During his military service as an interpreter in a POW camp from 1916 on, Meidner wrote the hymn-like prose poems that were later published in the collections "Im Nacken das Sternemeer" (The Sea of Stars at My Back) and "Septemberschrei" (September Cry). The texts and illustrations attest to his intense involvement with religion.'

Male Head with Kippah and Tallit (1930) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'In marked contrast to his earlier portraits, many of which have a theatrical effect, Meidner later began portraying his subjects in a more realistic fashion.'

“Praise the Lord, my soul” (1936/1937) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'This still life is an exception among Meidner's religious images, which consist primarily of drawings and mostly portray human figures. However, it is illuminating insofar as it underscores the main theme of Meidner's religious art.'

Blessing of Light at the End of the Sabbath (1935 - 1940) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'Meidner also shows how the blessing of light is recited, while everyone looks at their hands and the light reflected in their fingernails.'

Grieving Figure among the Dead (1942 - 1945) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'Meidner was deeply shocked by this news and began a picture cycle devoted to the Holocaust, which he titled "Leiden der Juden in Polen" (Suffering of the Jews in Poland) or "Massacres in Poland."'

Self-Portrait with Tallit (1965/66) by Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)Jewish Museum Frankfurt / Museum Judengasse

'In this uncompleted self-portrait, Ludwig Meidner depicts himself as a praying Jew with a tallit, kippah and prayer book. It is one of the last paintings Meidner worked on prior to his death on 14 May 1966.'

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