Unraveling Jumputan

The joy of unraveling colorful resist tie-dyeing

By Unit Pengelola Museum Seni

Jumputan Plangi (Shoulder cloth) (1940)Unit Pengelola Museum Seni

Jumputan

Jumputan is a resist tie-dyeing process known and used in Sumatra and Java. In Sumatra, jumputan is known by name 'pelangi' which translates as rainbow. In Java this 'jumputan' is called 'kain kembangan' or flower cloth because it would be dyed in the colors of flowers.

#0141 Kemben Jumputan (1975) by UnknownUnit Pengelola Museum Seni

'Plangi / Kembangan' is resist dyeing process combining tie-dye and a technique called 'tritik' . 'Tritik' are made by stitching and gathering the textile before dyeing. 

Jumputan Plangi (Rainbow shoulder cloth) (ca. 20th Century)Unit Pengelola Museum Seni

You can see traces of 'tritik' here. There are traces of tiny holes where the cloth was punctured by needles in the paisley design shape. 

#0142 Kemben Jumputan (1975) by UnknownUnit Pengelola Museum Seni

To compare, this is the result on regular tie-dye process would look like.

kemben 0432 by unknownUnit Pengelola Museum Seni

Jumputan, tie dye and tritik can sometimes be combined with batik technique like the brown, black, white dotted lines on the bottom side of this cloth. 

Female torso wrap (Kemben) (1975)Unit Pengelola Museum Seni

Used as female torso wrap

In Java, 'kain kembangan' would be wraped around a woman's torso. Each combinations of colors, design and technique has a symbolic reference to the ritual in which the cloth makes presence in an event. 

Jumputan Plangi (Rainbow shoulder cloth) (ca. 20th Century)Unit Pengelola Museum Seni

Used as sashes

In old Palembang court attires, Jumputan pelangi stoles would have been worn as sashes draped around the torso; today they are draped over shoulder in social events. 

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