Lord Howe Island

First discovered by Europeans in 1788, Lord Howe Island is a major tourist destination, 780 km (420 nmi) northeast of Sydney off the coast of New South Wales, Australia.

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) acknowledges the Turrbal and Yugara as the First Nations owners of the lands where QUT now stands. We pay respect to their Elders, lores, customs and creation spirits. We recognise that these lands have always been places of teaching, research and learning. QUT acknowledges the important role Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people play within the QUT community. 

Mounts Gower and Lidgbird from Mount Eliza, Lord Howe Island (2010) by Adam HallQUT Digital Collections

Looking towards Mt Lidgbird and Mt Gower

Lord Howe Island is regarded as a World Heritage Site of global significance by UNESCO. 

Flora of Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Twisted Trunks, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Much of the island is pristine forest, with many types of plants and animals not found anywhere else in the world.

House on Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Garden View, Leanda Lei Apartments, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Lord Howe is home to around 380 people, who enjoy a relaxed and peaceful lifestyle. The residents of Lord Howe Island live in harmony with nature, using renewable energy sources, recycling waste and protecting the endemic flora and fauna.

Tracks in the Sand, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Lord Howe has many beautiful beaches that attract tourists and nature lovers. Some of the most popular beaches are Ned's Beach, where visitors can feed fish by hand, Lagoon Beach, where snorkelers can explore the coral reef, and Blinky Beach, where surfers can catch waves.

View from Signal Point, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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One of the landmarks of the island is Signal Point, a rocky hill that overlooks the lagoon and the coral reef. Signal Point was used by the early settlers and visitors of the island as a lookout and a communication station. They would raise flags or light fires to signal ships passing by or to alert the islanders of any danger or news. Signal Point also served as a place for ceremonies, celebrations and gatherings. Today, Signal Point is a popular spot for tourists and locals alike.

Airport at Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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The island's airport receives flights from Sydney, Brisbane and Port Macquarie, and has a single asphalt runway. The airport is known for its scenic approach and landing, as well as its strict weight and baggage limits due to the short runway and environmental regulations. It was completed in 1974 and has a runway of 886 meters long and 30 meters wide.

The Jetty at Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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The jetty on Lord Howe Island is a popular spot for fishing and sightseeing. It is located at the northern end of the lagoon, near Signal Point and Hunter Bay. From the jetty, you can enjoy the views of the two mountains, Mount Lidgbird and Mount Gower, that dominate the island's landscape. The jetty is also close to Old Settlement beach, where you can swim, snorkel or relax on the sand.

Woodhen, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Lord Howe Island is a World Heritage Site that hosts many unique plants and animals. To protect its biodiversity, the island has taken several measures, such as eradicating invasive rodents, restoring native habitats, and monitoring threatened species. Two hundred and seven different bird species have been recorded on Lord Howe, thirty two of which breed on the island, including the endangered Woodhen. A further fifteen bird species are regular visitors to Lord Howe.

Silent Reflection at Middle Beach, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Middle Beach is a secluded spot that offers stunning views of the ocean and the mountains. It is accessible by a short hike from the main road, and is ideal for swimming, snorkeling, or relaxing on the sand. The beach is also home to a variety of wildlife, such as seabirds, turtles, and fish.

Middle Beach Looking North, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Grazing on Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Rocks at Johnson's Beach, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Grazing cattle on Lord Howe Island is a practice that dates back to the 19th century. The island has a subtropical climate and fertile soil that support pasture growth. Cattle provide meat, milk and cheese for the islanders, as well as manure for fertilizing crops. However, grazing also poses some environmental challenges, such as soil erosion, water pollution and loss of native vegetation.

Mount Gower through the Pine Trees, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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The mountains on Lord Howe Island are part of a volcanic remnant that rises from the Tasman Sea. The highest peak is Mount Gower, which reaches 875 metres above sea level. The mountains are home to many endemic plants and animals, such as the Lord Howe Island stick insect.

Golf Course, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Lord Howe Island Golf Course is a nine-hole course located at the south end of the island. The course offers stunning views of the ocean and Mount Gowe, as well as a challenging layout for golfers of all levels. The course is open year-round and has a clubhouse, a pro shop, and a restaurant.

Mounts Gower and Lidgbird Through The Trees, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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One of the best ways to explore the island is by hiking on its many tracks, which range from easy to challenging. Some of the most popular tracks are the Malabar Hill track, which gives panoramic views of the island and the ocean, the Little Island track, which leads to a secluded beach and a coral reef, and the Mt Gower track, which is a full-day hike to the highest point on the island.

View of Blackburn Island, Lord Howe Island, Adam Hall, 2010, From the collection of: QUT Digital Collections
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Blackburn Island is a small islet located in the lagoon of Lord Howe Island. The island is uninhabited and has a rich biodiversity of plants and animals, including some endemic species. Blackburn Island is a popular destination for snorkeling, kayaking and birdwatching.

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