World War II: Propaganda

Hutchings Museum Institute

Propaganda was a large part of life on the home front during World War II. This exhibit features some aspects of propaganda that the Hutchings Museum displays. Currency from around the world is also displayed.

Propaganda Postcard (3) Propaganda Postcard (3) (circa 1942) by Longshaw Card Co.Hutchings Museum Institute

Propaganda Postcards

Various forms of propaganda were used during World War II to boost morale, persuade citizens to buy war bonds, and put the enemy in a bad light. 

Propaganda Postcard (1) Propaganda Postcard (1) (circa 1942) by Tichnor Bros. Inc.Hutchings Museum Institute

Postcards were used widely as a form of propaganda. Postcards were largely circulated because they were cheap to create, buy, sell, and send. This meant the propaganda could be circulated throughout the country quickly. This postcard has been written on and used.

Propaganda Postcard (1) ReverseHutchings Museum Institute

Propaganda Postcard (2) Propaganda Postcard (2) (circa 1942) by E.C. Kropp Co.Hutchings Museum Institute

This postcard is promoting positive propaganda. Positive propaganda uses patriotism to get citizens to feel proud of their country. 

Dollywood Defense Doll Dollywood Defense Doll (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

Propaganda came in more forms than posters and postcards. Dollywood Defense Dolls were also sold as propaganda, marketing towards young children. They were designed by makeup artist Betty Westmore with proceeds being donated toward the war relief. Their name was eventually changed to "Dolls of the Allies."

Flying Fortress? Flying Coffins German Leaflet Flying Fortress? Flying Coffins German Leaflet (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

Axis Propaganda

Propaganda was used not only by Americans, but by the Axis powers as well. This leaflet was distributed by the Germans to discourage the Americans from their war efforts regarding an unsuccessful air raid over a German town. 

Flying Fortress? Flying Coffins German Leaflet Flying Coffins, From the collection of: Hutchings Museum Institute
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Safe-Conduct Pass Safe-Conduct Pass (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

Safe-Conduct/Passierschein

These leaflets were often called "passierschein." They were dropped over German troops and were to be waved by the German solider as a form of surrender. When they did so, they were taken as prisoners, but the passierschein gave them rights to food, water, removal from the danger zone, hospital care, and postal usage.

Safe-Conduct Pass Reverse, From the collection of: Hutchings Museum Institute
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The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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