World War II: Manuals

This exhibit features artifacts from the Veterans Memorial Hall of the Hutchings Museum. It showcases manuals used during World War II that were used throughout the branches of the United States Armed Forces.

The Bluejacket's Manual The Bluejacket's Manual (1944) by Archvie MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

The Blue Jacket's Manual

The "bible" for Navy personnel, these manuals have been distributed since 1902. This copy is the 12th edition, issued in 1944. These handbooks teach sailors about navy procedures.

Basic Field Manual Soldiers Handbook Basic Field Manual Soldiers Handbook (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

Basic Field Manual: Soldier's Handbook

An equivalent to the Bluejacket's Manual, the Soldier's Handbook had everything an Army Solider needed to know. In essence, they are how-to manuals for the solider including codes of conduct, instructions for handling weapons, symbols, combat instructions and other essential information. They usually were not carried around by soldiers, so it was expected that they learn and memorize the information, but they could reference them at headquarters and camps. The top right corner reads "FM 21-100," standing for Field Manual.

Tagalog Language Guide Tagalog Language Guide (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

Tagalog Language Guide

The top left corner signifies that this is a technical manual. This is a language guide that would give simple words and phrases in Tagalog so soldiers could communicate and get around the area. 

A Pocket Vocabulary of Malay, Pidgin English, and Japanese Phrases A Pocket Vocabulary of Malay, Pidgin English, and Japanese Phrases (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

Similar to the Tagalog Language Guide, this vocabulary book has phrases that are applicable for the solider as they served in the Southwest Pacific Area.

German Dictionary for the Soldier German Dictionary for the Soldier (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

German Dictionary For the Soldier

A soldier could have purchased a dictionary like this while there were serving on the Western Front. This dictionary is the second edition, published in 1944, by Frank Henius. 

Going Back to Civilian Life Booklet Going Back to Civilian Life Booklet (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

Going Back to Civilian Life Booklet

As soldiers were honorably discharged, there were given many resources to help make the transition back to civilian life easier. This booklet, along with a matching pin, were distributed to soldiers as they came home. The pin was to be worn to signify the honorable discharge. Formally, it is called the Honorable Service Lapel Button but colloquially, it is often called the "Ruptured Duck." The booklet's purpose was to address conduct for the soldier in times of peace and war. It outlines VA benefits and reestablishing a civilian life.

You're On Your Way Home, Soldier Booklet You're On Your Way Home, Soldier Booklet (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

This booklet was another resource given to soldiers as they prepared to come home. As there was a flood of soldiers coming home, this booklet warned them that they may not receive welcoming arms from everyone. It prepared them for the realities they would face: experiencing resentment from others, girlfriends now married, and an adjustment back to civilian life. 

War Ration Book War Ration Book (circa 1942) by Archive MaterialHutchings Museum Institute

Home Front

The home front had to make sacrifices as well. Resources were limited due the militaries need for them, so civilians were issued War Ration Books and Coupons. Each month, they were distributed a specific amount of coupons for gasoline, meat, flour, and sugar, among other things. They were often kept in booklets like these.

War Ration Book Inside ScanHutchings Museum Institute

This is the Ration Book that would have held the ration coupons.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
Google apps