Ofélia Marques

Learn about the artist's universe through a text accompanied by a selection of works from the exhibition “All I want – Portuguese women artists from 1900 to 2020”

By Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

Text by Lígia Afonso / Plano Nacional das Artes

Untitled (not dated) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

A self-taught visual artist born in the early 20th century, Ofélia Marques was a member of the Portuguese modernist movement, closely following its international developments alongside Bernardo Marques, a companion during a significant part of her career.

Untitled (not dated) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Untitled, not dated
Graphite and crayon on paper
34,2 x 48 cm
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian – Centro de Arte Moderna, inv. DP656

Untitled (not dated) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Untitled, not dated
Colour pencil, Indian ink, pastel and gouache on paper
26,1 x 39,4 cm
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian – Centro de Arte Moderna, inv. DP643

Untitled (not dated) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Untitled, not dated
Graphite and pastel on paper
45 x 65,2 cm
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian – Centro de Arte Moderna, inv. 80DP624

Untitled (not dated) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Untitled, not dated
Graphite, watercolour and Indian ink on paper
27,2 x 32,7 cm
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian – Centro de Arte Moderna, inv. DP637

Untitled (1933) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Essentially recognised for her work in painting, it was in drawing that her practice proved to be most innovative. She was a regular contributor to periodicals and illustrated books and was a pioneering creator of children's comic strips. It was, however, in her multiple deeply psychological self-portraits and in her series of portraits of friends, artists and writers imagined as caricatures of children that her work acquired a greater technical and reflective power. 

Untitled (1933) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Her erotic work, only presented to the public posthumously, reveals a more transgressive, irreverent, cosmopolitan and experimentalist facet of her work. Ofélia Marques' intimate homoerotic scenes depicting females are captured variously in black and white compositions, in luminously expressive and contrasting works of colour, and in India ink, graphite, crayon, pastel and gouache.

Untitled (1933) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

With a lushly sexualised ambience, these works reveal subtle and empathetic relationships of domination and subjugation, in which the presence of a cat appears perhaps as a metaphor.

Untitled (1933) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Untitled, 1933
Graphite, watercolour and Indian ink on paper
24,9 x 21,4 cm
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian – Centro de Arte Moderna, inv. DP652

Untitled (not dated) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Untitled, not dated
Indian ink and wash on paper
25,5 x 33 cm
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian – Centro de Arte Moderna, inv. DP631

Untitled (not dated) by Ofélia MarquesCalouste Gulbenkian Museum

Untitled, not dated
Indian ink on paper
27,5 x 34,5 cm
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian – Centro de Arte Moderna, inv. DP630

Credits: Story

Selection of works presented at the exhibition All I want: Portuguese women artists from 1900 to 2020, in its first moment at Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon, within the scope of the cultural program that takes place in parallel to the Portuguese Presidency of the Council of the European Union 2021.

Exhibition organized by the Portuguese Ministry of Culture, Directorate-General for Cultural Heritage (DGPC) and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, in co-production with the Center of Contemporary Creation Olivier Debré, Tours, and with the collaboration of the Plano Nacional das Artes (Portugal).

Curators:
Helena de Freitas and Bruno Marchand


Text by Lígia Afonso / Plano Nacional das Artes
Selection of online resources Maria de Brito Matias


Learn more about Ofélia Marques's works presented in the context of this exhibition:
All I want: Feminine Plural

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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All I Want
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