Threshold of the Bearable

What if it is overstepped?

Nonsense of > Progress < in Modern Psychofooling (2002) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

Lubo Kristek examines thresholds and critical points in his artworks. The threshold of the bearable is represented by a red-and-white dot-and-dash line.

Tax Landscape Surée (1997) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

The background of his collage Tax Landscape Surée consists of the official documents of the Mrs. Bißle‘s bankruptcy who lived in the house 71 years before Kristek. He found them during reconstruction  between the boards of the dropped ceiling.

Tax Landscape Surée (1997) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

What is still bearable?

Kristek ponders on existential pressure and its bearability for an individual. He identifies himself with Mrs. Bißle’s story, putting his hair and miniportrait into the collage.

Tax Landscape Surée (1997) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

Documents

Also historical evidence, old Reich’s notes, can be found in the artwork. Kristek calls his collages involving significant papers (official, medical, etc.) the ‘documents’.

Nonsense of > Progress < in Modern Psychofooling (2002) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

Psychofooling

In 2002, Lubo Kristek received a leaflet promoting a course on selling methods in his letter box. One of the themes was how to learn to ‘influence problematic clients’.

Nonsense of > Progress < in Modern Psychofooling (2002) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

Kristek couldn’t resist such a document and created the collage Nonsense of > Progress < in Modern Psychofooling.

Nonsense of > Progress < in Modern Psychofooling (2002) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

In his collages, he often pastes his sketches on tracing paper (he inherited kilometres of it from his father, an architect). The sketch of his oil painting This Is a Foreign World for Me marks the focal point of the collage. 

Nonsense of > Progress < in Modern Psychofooling (2002) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

He also used a Czech note that was valid at that time from which three crosses with a crucified nymph grow.

Nickel Silver Lady in Hat Nickel Silver Lady in Hat (2019) by Lubo KristekResearch Institute of Communication in Art

In Kristek’s assemblage Nickel Silver Lady in Hat, the threshold of the bearable represents a limit, beyond which a society is heading towards an irreversible demise.

Nickel Silver Lady in HatResearch Institute of Communication in Art

The plow symbolizes the beginning of agricultural age. Religion is an important attribute that is  referred to by the Bible and the rosary. 

The lady's fate is inextricably linked with nickel silver, which spirals around her bones.

Threshold of the bearable passes through the plow towards the female figure, of which only a skeleton remained. It ends in blood from the last period, which symbolizes total exhaustion.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
Explore more
Google apps