The origins of Molino Macuitl: corn and family. Part II

Molino Macuitl offers traditional dishes and seasonal products directly to the table. It promotes local consumption and fair economy in San Jerónimo Tecuanipan, Puebla.

By Cocina Cinco Fuegos

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Criollo Huitlacoche

During the rainy season, we go out to collect huitlacoches and we prepare them in the following way: we husk corn kernels and sauté them with a bit of butter; we then add garlic, onion, poblano bell pepper strips, the huitlacoche, and add a little bit of mint.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Yellow criollo peach and sweet-milk pear

Essential ingredients for chile en nogada, which are harvested from the trees on our land. We are located in San Jerónimo Tecuanipan, 34 km from the city of Puebla and on the way to the majestic Popocatépetl volcano.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Organic huevos criollos

My grandmother Carmen is in charge of our hens and turkeys. She feeds them criollo corn and collects their eggs before other animals eat them.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Walnuts

Seasonal ingredient for chile en nogada, a dish we eagerly await each year, both because of its flavor and its subtle presentation. In addition to walnut trees, we have chirimoya, peach, apple, pear, lemon, lime, Chinese pomegranate, plum, and hawthorn fruit trees, to name a few...

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

White mole with huitlacoche and xote

White mole is one of the most complex because of its balance between the spiciness of the güero chili and the flavor of the almonds and white pine nuts. <br>

For this mole, I treat the huitlacoche as if it were a protein, starting with a light roasting. Then I sauté it in toasted butter over low heat. I finish it with a little bit of truffle oil to bring out its flavor and grate a little bit of xote on top to give it notes of pine nut.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Mole de olor, a four generations-old recipe

In my home, mole de olor is a family legacy dating back four generations. It has a very particular flavor between its spiciness, sweetness, texture and aroma. Preparing it is very complicated, given that it has 21 ingredients, most of which we harvest.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Yellow corn atole with orange leaf and cardamom

In our house in the mornings, and before going to the field to work, having an atole is the law of the land. It can be prepared with anything: corn masa, pinole, yellow, blue or colored corn flour. We add chocolate, cinnamon or cardamom to give it its aroma and flavor. <br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Chile en nogada: traditional recipe of the Macuitl family

We prepare chiles en nogada with the seasonal poblano peppers and with three varieties of peach: yellow, torito, white. To give them a distinctive taste, we cook the ingredients in clay casseroles and over a low flame. <br>

We finish it off with the walnut sauce and garnish it with pomegranate and parsley, all products that we harvest on our land.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Chili loco native to San Jerónimo Tecuanipan

The chili loco is very special in our cuisine. We use it both green and dry, for adobos, pipianes, longaniza, salsas and cumin tamales.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Hoja santa

It grows abundantly in our land, and is a frequent ingredient in our cooking. We use it in tamales, green pipián, chileatole and to season esquite. It is also added to quelites, halaches, huauzontles and verdolagas. <br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Blue corn and amaranth hotcakes

We make the hotcakes with blue corn and a guayaba compote flavored with lippia (an herb with notes of lemon) and an apipisco or jaltomate (a small, black wild tomato) sala, and we finish it off with elder flowers, all seasonal ingredients.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Tlacoyos with different types of beans

In our cooking, we make tlacoyos with three varieties of corn: yellow, blue and red. We can also use different fillings: black beans with avocado leaf, butter beans with guajillo chili and raw beans. <br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Cactus salad

We cure the cactus with white salt for a few minutes. Them we strain them and dress them with a little bit of garlic oil and chili oil. We add queso fresco, cambray onion, and radish and garnish with a healthy dose of cilantro.

We present the salad on a clay plate made in Reyes Metzontla.<br>

Molino Macuitl y su origen el maíz y la familia. IICocina Cinco Fuegos

Green chow chow

At home, we have five seasonal varieties of chow chow. This in particular is cooked with tequesquite and white salt. Once peeled, we add honey and lemon. We eat it as a dessert, and in this form, it's a delicious experience. <br>

Credits: Story

<b>Curators:</b> Gustavo Macuitl<br>Lilia Martínez y Torres<br>María de la Cruz Ríos Yanes<br><b>Photographers/Creators:</b> fonda.branding: 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13, <br>Gustavo Macuitl: 5, 8, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18.<br>Angela Arciniaga: 6, 17.

Credits: All media
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