A DAY IN 68 PART 2

By Museum of the Purpose of the Object

Museum of the Purpose of the Object

The year of 1968 was a turning point for Mexican society. In this year great events occurred that shaped the modern Mexican identity in several spheres: from the technological to the social participation, passing through the economy, culture and entertainment. In this section we will review the importance of fashion as a vehicle for youth expression.

La Familia. Revista. (1968) by Editorial La Familia S.A.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

The appearances domain

Beginning in 1960, supported by technology and the atmosphere of freedom, avant-garde tendencies appeared in fashion. Fashion became a popular activity, consolidating prêt-à-porter (ready to wear) and mass clothing production.

Pop en la Moda. Suplemento. (1968) by Prensa Mexicana, S.A.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

The miniskirt appears in the mid-sixties in Europe, promoted by Mary Quant and André Courrèges. This design would be a knock out and cause controversy throughout the decade.

Pop en la Moda. Revista (1968) by Prensa Mexicana, S.A.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

In 1967 show up styles influenced by the Hippie Movement: androgynous fashion, prints of Hindu influence, and garments in denim.

Revista Playboy. (1968) by Editada por Playboy EnterprisesMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

The body paint appears as one more option to beautify the body, and is presented as a youthful expression.

Campamento Olímpico de la Juventud. Fotografía (1968) by Pool NacionalMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

Men Lova. Anuncio (1967) by La Concordia S.A.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

New textiles and synthetic materials such as polyester, dacron, rayon and acrylic became popular in the late 1960s. These materials allowed the creation of unusual silhouettes and extravagant designs, influenced by the Hippie movement and the space age.

Dacron. Anuncio (1965) by Du PontMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

Pixie. Crayones. (1969) by Manpebaja, S. A.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

In Mexico, fashion came through the department stores, such as El Palacio de Hierro and Liverpool, and was advertised in magazines such as La Familia, Crinolina, Kena, Última Moda or Social. In Mexican fashion stands out the designer Pixie Hopkin, which creates a business empire dedicated to beauty and fashion through the Pixie brand.

Pixie. Pestañas postizas. (1970) by Manpebaja, S.A.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

In the beginning, the Pixie brand specializes in producing makeup, false eyelashes and wigs. By the seventies it would cover the production of clothing and accessories.

Bolsa para embalaje (detalle) (1962) by El Puerto de LiverpoolMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

The first departmental stores appear in Mexico at the end of the 19th century.

In the 1960s, modern stores were opened outside the center of Mexico City.

Crema Teatrical. (1968) by Sanborn Hnos.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

In the department stores we find a great diversity of products and cosmetic devices aimed at both women and men.

Old Spice Lime. Estuche para viaje (1968) by Shulton de México, S. A.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

Vanart. Laca. (1968) by Compañía Distribuidora del Centro S.A. de C.V.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

Remington Princess. Rasuradora eléctrica (1968) by Sperry Rand CorporationMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

Modelo con bikini, diseño de Rudi Gernreich. (1968) by Revista LifeMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

Several designers promoted the sexual liberation of women to garments: Yves Saint Laurent promoted the androgynous aesthetics in their designs, Mary Quant caused a stir with her miniskirt, André Courrèges and Paco Rabanne explored new materials and Rudi Gernreich pushed the frontiers of gender and sexuality.

Diahann Carroll en bata de piel. (1968) by Revista LifeMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

Suplemento de moda. Revista Playboy (1968) by Alexas UrbaMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

La Familia. Revista (1968) by Editorial La Familia S.A.Museum of the Purpose of the Object

Paco Rabanne ajustando el vestido de modelo (1967) by Revista PlayboyMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

In 1968 the film "Barbarella" premiered starring Jane Fonda, with costumes by Paco Rabanne, which would cause great impact due to their unusual silhouettes.

Modelo con traje de Yves Saint-Laurent (1968) by Revista LifeMuseum of the Purpose of the Object

Yves Saint Laurent's designs empowered women thanks to the breaking of traditional norms, playing with sexuality and gender roles.

Credits: Story

MODO Team:

Antonio Soto, Arely Chong, Carlos Gónzalez, Daniel Cervantes, Diego Salgado, Edmundo Vargas, Javier Ávalos, Jonathan Torres, Lizbeth Chavez, Mariana Pérez, Martín Cruz, Natalia Cheng, Paulina Newman, Piedad Romero y Rosario Luna.

Selection and texts by Antonio Soto
Museo del Objeto del Objeto © 2018

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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