Explore the National Archaeological Museum of Naples

Take a virtual tour of the art and artifacts from Pompeii, Herculaneum, and more

By Google Arts & Culture

Welcome to the National Archaeological Museum

Naples, with its proximity to the sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum, is one of Italy's most important archaeological locations. As such, it's the perfect place for the National Archaeological Museum, which houses a huge collection of Greek and Roman antiquities. 

The gallery's wings hold a trove of mosaics and wall paintings which survived the eruption of nearby Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, as well as artifacts, coins, and frescoes from throughout ancient history.

Original and reproduced busts of Roman and Greek gods and luminaries populate the rooms and corridors, which you can wander here.

Keep clicking the arrows and dragging the screen to see all the museum has to offer!

The fall of Icarus, 45-79 d.C., From the collection of: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli
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Male seated statue (Mars?), 2010/2018, From the collection of: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli
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Medallions whit landscapes, 45-79 d.C., From the collection of: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli
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Giovane con rotolo, 50-79 d.C., From the collection of: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli
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Satyrs, 1-37 d.C., From the collection of: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli
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Head of Alexander, II metà del IV secolo a.C., From the collection of: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli
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Discover the ancient art of Greece and the Roman Empire

This painting, often called Sappho, is a firm favourite amongst the museum's collection.

Dating from around 55-79 AD, it was salvaged from the town of Pompeii, which was buried by the ash and debris of a catastrophic eruption of the nearby volcano, Mount Vesuvius, in 79 AD.

Though it killed thousands, the ash actually preserved the city (and the trapped bodies of its people!) for over a millennium. The gesso background and wall paint on this piece have survived remarkably intact.

Named for the legendary erotic poet of the Greek island, Lesbos, Sappho probably shows a member of Pompeii high society, posing as a poet with pen, wax tablets, and an air of being caught in the ecstasy of composition.

SaffoMuseo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli

Discover the full collection here.

The BuildingMuseo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli

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The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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