Combined Argument: Written Records and Logistic methods.

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Hegemony status on Japan and Germany must be lifted in the light of document disclosure by Google Cultural Institute, which appeared in this very user’s gallery. The two-fold argument considers the logistic methods and telecommunication technology upon infrastructures were developed in secrecy and without regards to nowadays environmental norms. The claim states that in order to restitute to the occupied countries their patrimony and to compensate for damage to its art treasury and loss of authority upon their patrimony and art treasury, then hegemony on Japan and Germany must be lifted. The main argument in support to the main claim is that early responses were disproportionate with early warfare resistance against the Allies in their military intervention, and that unexpected delay in post mail delivery had made impossible to send the right information at the right time upon whether or not the use of force was legitimate as an instrumental means to the end of WW2. Firstly, without hearing this claim forwards hegemony on Japan and Germany must be lifted, actual Allies infrastructures cannot be removed from their location for their being substituted with modern technology, which must be in agreement with current environmental norms. Secondly, without hearing this claim forwards hegemony on Japan and Germany must be lifted, art treasury and patrimony that belong to the occupied countries cannot be restituted fully in the light of the jointed written records describing a technological process in the wake of three segments of wars: 18th century with the print matter and post-delivery implementation concerns, WW1 with the underground lines for telecommunication, and WW2 for the logistic methods that developed more fully the technological warfare was implemented, developed, and activated against the wills of occupied countries before WW2.       To begin with managing the art treasures, the innovative development, the print matter for Post Office services, countries were hosts of conferences about the "End-of-War" treaties, and documents introducing explanation for the outcomes of early responses against resistance and upon the scheme for which art strategy loathing were directed towards slowing the Allies in their military intervention in occupied countries: one of the document specifies that any art treasures still belong to their genuine patrimony and that immovable cultural heritage must be administered by a particular office and organization for its patrimony protection. In that sense logistic methods are part of past history and neither the underground materials nor the surface telecommunication lines actually belong to the allies for having freed the occupied countries, but rather in rewards and compensation for having been damaged and having lost their art treasury while being in a state of occupied country in the invasion process by the German. Consequently, innovative development of artifacts of logistic technology for communication and its methods must be part of this patrimony heritage as an art treasure that must be restituted to the particular host country.  Finally, always looking at color in some photographs, there may be some survivors upon which their warfare’s burden is involved in the measures were taken in the past, upon the process of hegemony that must be lifted for both Japan and Germany, as early responses commitment by the Allies against early resistance, upon the environmental convention that discriminate the use of logistic methods that are unsafe for the environment, and upon usage of print matters were used in secrecy and without sufficient documentation for the intellectual owner of biological treatment be asserting that their level of competency in scientific progress doing was high enough for the military treatment be appropriate, and thereof clearance for ownership of royalty upon these very technological concerns must be restituted to the host countries in which the infrastructure had been developed from the 18th century to WW1 and finally containing the technological issues of WW2. Consequently, hegemony must be lifted upon both Japan and Germany and these outcomes be dated backward from the date that appeared on the jointed documents forwards their public disclosure and so ruling in favor of my claim that hegemony must be lifted upon both Japan and Germany.Kevin Genest, 1986.

Memorandum from General Eisenhower on preservation of historic monuments, Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum of the National Archives and Records Administration, 1944-05-26, Original Source: http://www.eisenhower.archives.gov/research/online_documents/monuments_men.html
Cable from General Eisenhower to General Marshall, April 11, 1945, Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum of the National Archives and Records Administration, 1945-04-11, Original Source: http://www.eisenhower.archives.gov/research/online_documents/monuments_men.html
"THE MISSION OF THE MFA&A BRANCH." From Annex XX (Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives) to Basic Preliminary Plan. Page 4, National Archives and Records Administration, 1945-02/1945-04, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
Page 1., From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
Harry Ettlinger, a veteran of the Monuments Men, with a photo of himself as a 19 year old G.I., National Archives and Records Administration, 2014-05-08, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
President George W. Bush Presents the National Humanities Medal to the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, National Archives and Records Administration, 2007-11-15, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
1d trials in blue, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Telegraph lines held in place with spades, The British Postal Museum and Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Proof of lettersheet with experimental background, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post Office notice of introduction of stamps, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
1s embossed on covers to India and China, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
1d trials in olive green in carbonate of potash, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
The Penny Black, stamped cover on first day of issue., 1840, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
1s embossed sheet with silk thread paper, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
1d blue with black ink cancellations, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Christmas and New Year fan-shaped greetings card, Goodall and Sons, c.1880, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Waiting in the dark, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Travel early, shop early, post early for Christmas, Rothholz, Hans Arnold, c.1950, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Letter to all postmasters, 1841, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post Early for Christmas poster, Huveneers, Peter, 1956, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post Office Switch Cabin - Artwork for poster, The British Postal Museum & Archive, Richard Ziegler, 1939, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post early, Saxon Artists, c.1956, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Human ladder for telephone, The British Postal Museum and Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Your Christmas Packets & Parcels Should Be Posted by Dec. 18, Lewitt, Jan and Him, George, 1941, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Shop Early Post Early, Fraser, Eric, 1946, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Old original die, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
A Merry Christmas Perfume Sachet, c.1860-c.1880, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Tho' the season cold and drear... Christmas card, c.1880, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post much earlier this X-mas, Lewitt, Jan and Him, George, 1950, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post Office permit, The British Postal Museum & Archive, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post Early. Parcels by Dec. 18. Letters and cards by Dec. 20, Lewitt, Jan and Him, George, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post early poster, Knight, Alick, 1951, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Post Early, Unger, Hans, 1964, From the collection of: The Postal Museum
Loudspeaker, 1941/1945, From the collection of: The Museum of the Siege of Leningrad
First page of memo Herbert Hoover wrote to Harry Truman., Herbert Hoover Presidential Library, 1945-05-28, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
A leaflet with the address of the garrison of Soviet Hanko to Baron Von Mannerheim., 1941/1941, From the collection of: Museum of the Great Patriotic War
Silk Route, 1944, From the collection of: Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei
Radio Free Orange Turntable, 1940/1945, From the collection of: Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei
Dwight D. Eisenhower and General Omar N. Bradley Tour German Salt Mines in Which Stolen Treasure was Hidden, National Archives and Records Administration, 1945-04-12, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
Insurgents’ small cemetery, Halina Bala (“Małgorzata”), Press War Correspondent, 1944-08-16, From the collection of: Warsaw Rising Museum
Resistance Tea Spoons, 1940/1945, From the collection of: Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei
Original Burial Cross of an American Liberator, 1944, From the collection of: Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei
Rupert Doll, 1944/1945, From the collection of: Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei
Gasproof Baby Buggy, 1940, From the collection of: Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei
Blessed Radio, 1943/1945, From the collection of: Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei
Telegram from Herbert Hoover to Sec. Bunny Miller, Herbert Hoover Presidential Library, 1946-04-18, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
Eleanor Roosevelt addressing the United Nations General Assembly, Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum of the National Archives and Records Administration, 1948-12-09, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
The only connection between the two fighting districts, Wisław Chrzanowski, 1944-09, From the collection of: Warsaw Rising Museum
Before capitulation, Wiesław Chrzanowski, 1944-10-01, From the collection of: Warsaw Rising Museum
End of war, Wiesław Chrzanowski, 1945-05-03, From the collection of: Warsaw Rising Museum
After leaving the sewer, Joachim Joachimczyk „Joachim”, 1944-09-02, From the collection of: Warsaw Rising Museum
B2 Spy Radio Set, 1942/1945, From the collection of: Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei
Freezing the fish, Unknown, 1941/1945, From the collection of: The State Yakutia United Museum of History and Culture of the People of the North
Order by Wilhelm Keitel “Application of Military Jurisdiction in the Barbarossa Region and Special Army Measures." 13 May 1941, 1941/1941, From the collection of: Russian Military Historical Society
August enthusiasm, Andrzej Ancuta "Kier", Press War Correspondent, 1944-08, From the collection of: Warsaw Rising Museum
Conference Table at the Potsdam Conference, Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum at the National Archives and Records Administration, 1945-07, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
Scout Launch Vehicle, L-60-1189, National Aeronautics Space Administration, The National Archives at Philadelphia, NASA, 1960, From the collection of: U.S. National Archives
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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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