The Japanese Art of Kimonos

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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.

Japanese art covers a wide range of art styles,periods and media. The Kimono dates back to the 8th century and is a symbol of the Japanese culture.  Originally the word, "kimono" was the Japanese word for "clothing".  The kimono is a T-shape style of clothing that is worn wrapped across the front like a jacket and tied with a sash (obi).  This type of clothing offered many advantages to the Japanese culture.  The wearer of the garment did not have to be concerned with the size (one size fit all), and the Kimonos were easy to fold and adaptable to different seasonal weather.  Certain colors were worn to express status and for communication. The Japanese culture blends an appreciation for nature with everyday life into the designs on the kimonos. Nowadays, Japanese people rarely wear Kimonos in everyday life; they are reserved for weddings, funerals, custom rituals and other celebrations.  This gallery also includes the artwork of Katsushika Hokusai, a Japanese artist from the Edo period.  He is one of the most famous printmakers of the 19th century.  We will look at his work for artistic inspiration in the creation of our Kimono designs.

Furisode, Japanese, 1801/68, From the collection of: The Art Institute of Chicago
Kimono, 1900/1929, From the collection of: Textile Museum of Canada
Man's robe restyled as a Tibetan chuba, Unknown, 17th century, From the collection of: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Hanging a Poem on a Cherry Tree, Ishikawa Toyonobu, Japan, Edo period -1868 -1615, From the collection of: University of Michigan Museum of Art
Dance, Hashimoto Meiji, 1966, From the collection of: Yamatane Museum of Art
Woman in Kimono at Machiya in Kyoto, Japan, B. Tanaka, 2007-04-06, From the collection of: Getty Images
A garden in the Daigoji Temple grounds, autumn, World Heritage Site, Kyoto, Japan, Photograph By David Messent, 2008-12-12, From the collection of: Getty Images
Garden, Daigoji Temple grounds, autumn, Temple, Kyoto, Japan, Photograph By David Messent, 2008-12-12, From the collection of: Getty Images
A Pagoda at Kyoto's Enryakuji Temple, B. Tanaka, 2007-11-30, From the collection of: Getty Images
Japanese Kimonos, Walter Sanders, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Japanese Kimonos, Walter Sanders, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Japanese Kimonos, Walter Sanders, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Japanese Kimonos, Walter Sanders, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Portrait of a Japanese Woman (Mrs. Kuroki), Edmond-François Aman-Jean, 1922, From the collection of: The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo
Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: The Great Wave Off the Coast of Kanagawa, Katsushika Hokusai, Edo period, 19th century, From the collection of: Tokyo National Museum
Peonies and Canary (Shakuyaku, kanaari), from an untitled series known as Small Flowers, Katsushika Hokusai, published by Nishimuraya Yohachi (Eijudō), about 1834 (Tenpō 5), From the collection of: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Kirifuri Waterfall on Mount Kurokami in Shimotsuke Province (Shimotsuke Kurokamiyama kirifuri notaki), from the series Waterfalls in Various Provinces (Shokoku takimeguri), Katsushika Hokusai, Japanese, 1760 - 1849, c. 1832-1833, From the collection of: Philadelphia Museum of Art
Lost-love shell (Katashigai) from the series 'A shell-matching game with Genroku thirty-six linked verses (Genroku kasen kai-awase)', Katsushika HOKUSAI, 1821, From the collection of: Art Gallery of South Australia
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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