Himno Nacional Mexicano

The General Archive of the Nation preserves the original score, endorsed by the three powers of the Union, of the National Anthem, this document establishes how it should be interpreted by all Mexicans.

By Archivo General de la Nación - México

Himno Nacional Mexicano (1968) by Jaime Nunó y Francisco González BocanegraArchivo General de la Nación - México

Originally, our hymn consisted of 10 stanzas and a chorus. The current version of the Hymn consists of only four of its stanzas and the chorus.  

Himno Nacional Mexicano (1968) by Jaime Nunó y Francisco González BocanegraArchivo General de la Nación - México

The origin of the Anthem is from 1853 when a contest is created to create a poem for the creation of a hymn that identifies all Mexicans, the winner was Francisco González Bocanegra.  

Himno Nacional Mexicano (1968) by Jaime Nunó y Francisco González BocanegraArchivo General de la Nación - México

The following year another contest was created to put Bocanegra's poem to music and the winner was Jaime Nunó. The hymn was performed for the first time by the Italian opera company directed by maestro Juan Bottesini, at the National Theater on September 16, 1854.  

Volante impreso del Himno Nacional MexicanoArchivo General de la Nación - México

For the period of Benito Juárez as president of the Republic, the Anthem was disapproved of being considered lacking in nationalism and exalting the figures of Iturbide and Santa Anna, being replaced by the March of Zaragoza and the Republican March.  

"Homenaje a Jaime Nunó y Gonzáles Boca Negra" (1942) by El NacionalArchivo General de la Nación - México

And it was until the Porfirio Díaz regime that the Anthem would once again be taken into account to be interpreted in official ceremonies, thus, it would recognize the figures of Francisco González Bocanegra and Jaime Nunó as honorary authors of the National Anthem.  

Himno Nacional Mexicano (1968) by Jaime Nunó y Francisco González BocanegraArchivo General de la Nación - México

Despite being known and used as a hymn to the homeland since 1854, it was made official until 1943, based on a decree issued by the President of the Mexican Republic, Manuel Ávila Camacho.  

Himno Nacional Mexicano (1968) by Jaime Nunó y Francisco González BocanegraArchivo General de la Nación - México

In 1968 the Law on the Shield, the Flag, and the National Anthem was published in the Official Gazette of the Federation, which specifies the use and characteristics of these national symbols; and it establishes that a model authenticated by the three powers of the union must.

Himno Nacional Mexicano traducido a lengua indigena (1998) by José Farias GalindoArchivo General de la Nación - México

By 2005, Article 39 of said Law was adapted to allow indigenous peoples to translate the lyrics into their own languages, being transcribed in: Chinanteco, Otomí, Mixtec, Mayan, Nahuatl and Huasteco.  

Himno Nacional Mexicano (1968) by Jaime Nunó y Francisco González BocanegraArchivo General de la Nación - México

The Law that governs National Symbols indicates that it can only be sung at official, civic, sports, cultural or school events and must only be performed by an orchestra, symphonic band, piano, with voice or a cappella.  

The Flag, the Shield and the Anthem represent the values ​​and the history of the peoples. Which, added to the customs and traditions, create a sense of belonging to the nation and contribute to consolidate our identity. Get to know your original national symbols on your visit.

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