Storhaug Part 3 – Post-Industrial

A tour of the works found within the eastern part of Storhaug characterised by wooden houses, old factory buildings, and fast paced urban regeneration.

By Nuart

Stavanger East is the general term given to the greater area from Tou to the city centre. This mixed business and residential area is made up of old 19th century wooden houses, interspersed with larger industrial buildings, urban renewal and regeneration.

The area is regarded as the regions 'arts hub' where you'll find art and design studios, independent arts spaces and creative industry start ups. The region contains a significant amount of large-scale murals on both industrial sites and residential housing.

[click on an artwork title, top left, for further details about a piece]

Untitled (September 2010) by M-CityNuart

M-City (2010)

Better known as M-City, Mariusz Waras is a Polish artist who grew up in a city surrounded by an industrial landscape, brimming with factories, chimneys and cranes.

This influence is clear throughout his work, and there is a brutal yet refined nature to M-City’s art. His painting technique and use of stencils allows for him to produce work which has a visual similarity with heavily inked woodblock prints.

ALIVE (September 2016) by SpYNuart

SpY (ES)

ALIVE (2016)

Spanish artist SpY’s work remains firmly rooted in graffiti, but has evolved over the years to sit alongside other contemporary conceptual artists. SpY is dedicated to exploring word-play and the graphic dominion of text in our everyday life.

ALIVE (September 2016) by SpYNuart

Located in the soon-to-be-demolished industrial district of Stavanger, left abandoned during the recent crisis, SpY took full advantage of the natural elements available to him to articulate a message of defiance and resistance to loss and gentrification.

Henrik Uldalen (NO)

In his second outdoor mural ever undertaken, Norwegian fine artist Henrik Aarrestad Uldalen approached his wall for the 2016 Nuart Festival wanting to convey a message of love and warmth in uneasy times; a tender message wrapped in his signature dark palette and classic figurative painting style.

There is a deep sense of longing and loneliness permeating Uldalen’s work whether it be on canvas or wall. The figures he paints have a melancholic aura and precarious beauty.

Untitled, Henrik Uldalen, September 2016, From the collection of: Nuart
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Monument to a Disappearing Monument (September 2016) by Fintan MageeNuart

Fintan Magee (AU)

Monument to a Disappearing Monument (2016)

The oil-driven city of Stavanger was hit hard by the steep drop in oil prices seen globally in 2016.

In this work, Australian artist Fintan Magee calls attention to the impact of this unfolding crisis for the local working class. This site-specific work is one of the largest murals in the city, spanning across two 32-meter silos in the soon-to-be demolished industrial district.

Magee photographed a local oil worker, and set about creating this diptych – one half a portrait, and the other a fading reflection of the original. In a show of solidarity, Magee’s piece underlines the precarious economic future of the working class.

Monument to a Disappearing Monument, Fintan Magee, September 2016, From the collection of: Nuart
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Balaclava Girl (September 2010) by DolkNuart

Dolk (NO)

Balaclava Girl (2010)

Having established himself early on as one of Norway’s leading stencil artists with a career spanning back to 2003, Dolk has made waves with his contrasting, abstract buff project, and his aim to paint 100 walls in 50 cities.

This piece from 2010 however, departs from this project. Painted by hand, yet retaining the simplistic quality of a stencil, it illustrates a woman painting on a balaclava, as if she were preparing for a revolution.

Interestingly, the visual foreshadows the rise of feminist Russian art activist band and political movement, Pussy Riot in 2011, shortly after this piece was painted.

Scratching the Surface Project (September 2013) by VhilsNuart

Vhils (PT)

Coining his signature style in 2007, VHILS (Alexandre Farto) uses dynamite and a chisel to create his paintless-portraits. In the decade prior, he was a prolific graffiti writer.

VHILS is a recurring artist in Stavanger during the Nuart Festival. This piece from 2013 peers out from in between buildings, inviting viewers to take a closer look at his distinctive chiseling method.

Scratching the Surface Project (September 2011) by VhilsNuart

This piece from Nuart’s 2011 festival is unusual, as the artist mostly works with portraiture.

In this now obsolete work, we get a glimpse into a rare piece from VHILS that does not feature flesh, only bone.

Scratching the Surface Project (September 2010) by VhilsNuart

In this piece from 2010, you can see the artist begin to refine his technique as he learns from the walls he works with.

Scratching the Surface Project (September 2010) by VhilsNuart

Comparing this early work with the future pieces he created for Nuart, one in 2011 and a further portrait from 2013, creates an interesting visual timeline in VHILS’ progression.

Vhils (PT)

Coining his signature style in 2007, VHILS (Alexandre Farto) uses dynamite and a chisel to create his paintless-portraits. In the decade prior, he was a prolific graffiti writer.

The bas-relief portraiture he now creates across the globe is a visually arresting form of poetry. By digging through layers of concrete, cement and other building materials, VHILS exposes the old wounds of a wall and transforms them into something beautiful – a unique method which has carved VHILS a permanent place of his own in contemporary art.

The Action of Occupying Space (September 2016) by HyuroNuart

Hyuro (AR)

The Action of Occupying Space (2016)

In 2019, Argentinian artist Tamara Djurovic, also known as Hyuro, produced two pieces of artwork in Stavanger with Paint The Change, an international project that creates local and global street art campaigns to highlight social justice issues and promote community outreach.

In a response to the unfolding refugee crisis across Europe, Hyuro painted this stirring piece of two extended arms, crossing over a centre border from opposing directions.

Like in much of her surrealist figurative work, there is a lack of identifying features, including faces, allowing the viewer to project themselves into her work.

This allows for a chain to form between her art and her audience - Hyuro’s work calls for out for empathy and immersion, giving us all space to imagine who else we could be.

Klosser (September 2016) by Axel VoidNuart

Axel Void (ES)

Klosser (2016)

Located on the side of a kindergarten where he was simultaneously working on a documentary, Axel Void created this piece as a reflection on the meaning of play. Through the various stages of our lives, what does play mean to us?

From where we sit now, in the houses we have built for ourselves, regressing to the age of playing with blocks and creating houses, the work evokes layers of thinking.

Klosser, Axel Void, September 2016, From the collection of: Nuart
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Axel Void

Half Haitian and raised in Spain, Axel Void was exposed to classical painting alongside graffiti, two contrasting artforms which have been influential in the work he creates today. A play on darkness and light, both in palette and subject matter, as an artist he has an ability to straddle duality, alongside a very strong technical ability to paint.

First day of school (September 2014) by Etam CruNuart

Etam Cru (PL)

First Day of School (2014)

As the Nuart Festival is always celebrated just as Stavanger’s school-aged children return for a new year of learning, Etam Cru created this piece for the city, entitled “Back to School.”

Etam Cru (PL)

Polish duo Etam Cru is composed of Przemek Blejzyk aka Sainer, and Mateusz Gapski aka Bezt, who met while studying fine art in Lodz. Their dream-like and hyper clean murals are heavily saturated without being overwhelming. Often the pair incorporate references to Eastern European folklore and mysticism.

Both members of Etam Cru have graffiti backgrounds and are a model example of how the urban art scene is an ever evolving crossover between forms of public art.

Untitled (September 2012) by How & NosmNuart

How & Nosm (US)

Untitled (2012)

Working in complete synchronicity and with an ability to finish each other’s linework, identical twin brothers How & Nosm left their mark on Stavanger in 2012.

Crafted in their signature palette of red, pink and greyscale, the piece is rich in intricate detail. Both artists are members of the infamous, Bronx based graffiti family, TATS CRU.

Shirt Mask x King of Hearts (September 2019) by Nuno ViegasNuart

Nuno Viegas (PT)

Shirt Mask x King of Hearts (2019)

Muralist and painter, Nuno Viegas’ artistic roots are entrenched in the late 90’s graffiti scene, from where the Portugese artist continues to draw inspiration. Upon moving to the Netherlands, Viegas’ work evolved, leading him to discover a new artistic identity.

His newer artwork represents a uniquely straddled space between the worlds of muralism and graffiti.

Shirt Mask x King of Hearts (September 2019) by Nuno ViegasNuart

Approaching each mural and painting as a continuous tribute to the Graffiti Writers who keep the scene alive, he represents the culture through his visually captivating work, in a time where the definition of graffiti tends to get blurred and mixed with street art.

A symbiotic balance between his rougher graffiti roots and the pursuit of fulfilling his dream – to tag the moon – the works of Nuno Viegas continue to expand through walls and galleries across the globe.

Levitate (September 2015) by Martin WhatsonNuart

Martin Whatson (NO)

Levitate (2015)

Norwegian artist Martin Whatson has a unique ability to straddle both the masculine and feminine in his work.

Largely composed of more uniform greyscale layered stencils, and embellished in a flourish of colourful details, ranging from graffiti tags to hearts and doves, Whatson references the visual duality and playfulness that animates street art.

Whatson often uses his platform to poke fun at society, sometimes leaning into deeply political territory while retaining a visually engaging form.

Hired Gun (September 2018) by Helen BurNuart

Helen Bur (UK)

Hired Gun (2018)

British painter Helen Bur sits firmly in the camp of artists that can seamlessly coexist in both the traditional fine art world and the ever evolving landscape of Urban Art.

Burr adapts her painting techniques depending on her canvas, whether it be linen or concrete. Choosing to focus on the oversaturation of imagery and information in popular culture, Bur’s work relays the daily surreality we all face in relation to the media.

Through her dreamlike figurative situations and nods to magical realism, she points to these hyperreal visualisations as our norm.

Moss Forest (September 2018) by MurmureNuart

Murmure (FR)

Moss Forest (2018)

In a dark take on how our attempts to combat forest fires and climate change at large may be futile, Murmure use the naturally occurring surroundings of their chosen location for maximum message broadcasting.

Murmure Street (FR)

Paul Ressencourt and Simon Roche, both classically trained fine artists, have been creating installations together in the public arena since 2010, under the name Mumure Street. They employ a mixture of techniques, including chalk applied drop shadows and fine paper applications. Their work leads with a strong vein of realism, which paradoxically carries a poetic and often dreamlike message for viewers.

The French duo explore the boundaries of art and communication with their work, blending their pieces seamlessly into an array of environments and allowing their visuals to interact with the unique attributes of each location.

The Tear Collector (September 2018) by Nimi & Rh74Nuart

Nimi & Rh74 (NO)

The Tear Collector (2018)

Having collaborated on several editions of Nuart Festival over the years, Nimi & RH74 joined forces once more for this piece.

The Tear Collector (September 2018) by Nimi & Rh74Nuart

In creating this mural, the artist duo propose a visual commentary on the child refugees of Lesbos, reflecting on how their traumatic experiences in turn can lead to an emotional disconnect.

Wiches of Wiches (September 2018) by Milu CorrechNuart

Milu Correch (AR)

Wiches of Wiches (2018)

Best known for her large-scale figurative murals, Argentinian artist and provocater Milu Correch leads the way for South America’s fine-art leaning muralists.

Often using local histories as the contextual base for her pieces, Milu’s work draws from literature, film, and illustrations pertaining to regional events.

Wiches of Wiches (September 2018) by Milu CorrechNuart

In a continuation of her body of work exploring the brutal history of Western Europe’s Witchcraft Trials, Milu dug into the story of accused Norwegian witch Johanne Pedersdatter, who was burned at the stake in 1622.

[Street view: Click and drag to move around]

A Truth That is Beauty. A Beauty That is Truth (September 2017) by Ricky Lee GordonNuart

Ricky Lee Gordon (SA)

A Truth That is Beauty. A Beauty That is Truth (2017)

This mural celebrates the bravery of activists around the world, who are always more frequently harassed and intimidated for defending human rights. This large-scale mural on Stavanger’s Paradis train station celebrates Sakris Kupila, atransgender rights defender from Finland.

The project was realised in partnership with Amnesty International.

Slutt å Bore i Arktis (September 2019) by Dr.DNuart

Dr.D (UK)

Slutt å Bore i Arktis (2019)

Often described as a visual activist, Dr. D (UK) tackles the notion that advertising, whether official or commercial, is a social pollutant.

With a 23 year long background in fly-posting, Dr. D has all the tools he needs in his arsenal to deal with the matter at hand; whether it be altering existing bus shelter advertisements, or changing road signs and official train information.

Often his interventions are so subtle that they catch viewers of his work off guard, with a disruptive and often comical impact.

Untitled (September 2008) by Know HopeNuart

Know Hope (US)

Untitled (2008)

Israeli artist Know Hope’s body of work takes a multitude of forms, including murals, site-specific installations, mixed media, text and photography.

Untitled (September 2008) by Know HopeNuart

In a bid to incite thought provoking parallels between the political and emotional declarations that haunt our times, Know Hope uses public spaces as a conduit to relay dislocated yet intimate statements that arrest the viewer’s everyday motion.

A Collective Heartbreak, Know Hope, September 2017, From the collection of: Nuart
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Know Hope (US)

Israeli artist Know Hope’s body of work takes a multitude of forms, including murals, site-specific installations, mixed media, text and photography. In a bid to incite thought provoking parallels between the political and emotional declarations that haunt our times, Know Hope uses public spaces as a conduit to relay dislocated yet intimate statements that arrest the viewer’s everyday motion.

“A Collective Heartbreak” is a series of pieces Know Hope presented for Nuart 2017. Scattered across the city, in sometimes hard-to-reach locations, each one holds a message that most viewers can relate to in an abstract yet oddly intimate way.

In speaking to the citizens of Stavanger, Know Hope collected shared stories of heartbreak, which he pooled his own messages from. Each statement allows the viewer to recall their own aligned experience, and the emotional weight it left – ultimately reminding us that we are never without hope, even when experiencing deep loss.

In Spite of Our Pledges (A Collective Heartbreak) (September 2017) by Know HopeNuart

In Spite of Our Pledges (A Collective Heartbreak)

With Promises (A Collective Heartbreak) (September 2017) by Know HopeNuart

With Promises (A Collective Heartbreak)

Yet Here It Is (A Collective Heartbreak) (September 2017) by Know HopeNuart

Yet Here It Is (A Collective Heartbreak)

I Still Feel (A Collective Heartbreak) (September 2017) by Know HopeNuart

I Still Feel (A Collective Heartbreak)

Conzo & Glöbel (UK)

Glasgow-based duo Conzo & Glöbel, also known as the Glöbel brothers, have a unique and striking style. A vivid visual mash-up of Ciaran Glöbel’s graphic design background and contemporary take on traditional sign writing is interlaced with Conzo Throb’s realistically styled, yet surreal character-based elements.

The combination of the two artists’ work is impressive and highly skilled, offering a tongue in cheek take on their subject matter, and burying clues in their work for viewers to find.

Thorfin – Sardines in North Sea Oil (September 2018) by Conzo & GlöbelNuart

Conzo & Glöbel (UK)

Thorfin – Sardines in North Sea Oil (2018)

Thorfin – Sardines in North Sea Oil (September 2018) by Conzo & GlöbelNuart

Reflecting on how the inflated cost of beer in Norway aligns with rising oil prices, Conzo & Glöbel took a close look how the sardine canning and label industry boomed in turn.

This led to many employees in the field turning their attention to more artistic endeavours, designing and producing the cans’ labels.

Credits: Story

Curator: Martyn Reed 
Design and project management: Studio Bergini
Photography: Brian Tallman, Ian Cox, John Rodger, Kalevkevad, CF Salicath, Linn Heidi Knutsen
Videos: Fifth Wall, MZM Projects, Saft Film
Supported by: Stavanger Kommune, Rogaland Fylkeskommune
©Nuart Festival, 2001–2021

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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