José De Guimarães International Arts Centre Collections

Visit the collections of African Art, Pre-Columbian Art and Ancient Chinese Art and the contemporary art exhibitions that dialogue with the permanent collection.

By Rede Portuguesa de Arte Contemporânea a Norte (RPAC – Norte)

Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Nkisi Nkondo fetish (20th Century) by UnknownOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Nkisi Nkondo Fetish

The ritual practices that activate the Nkisi figures consist of libations, nails and blades that remain attached to the figure. Over time, the marks accumulated by the Nkisi figure highlight successes, also increasing their plastic dimension and capacity to inspire fear and awe.

Kifwebe male mask (20th Century) by UnknownOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Kifwebe male mask

These masks, worn with a raffia cloth garment and a long raffia beard, are present in many Kifwebe ceremonies and play the role of "watchmen" at the service of supernatural powers.

Kru/Grebo Mask (20th Century) by UnknownOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Grebo/Kru mask

The tubular, protruding eyes are a characteristic feature of the traditional sculptures of the Grebo/Kru people. A people inhabiting the border between Ivory Coast and Liberia, who became known for their excellent navigational skills and fierce resistance to the processes of transatlantic slavery and colonialism.

Kantana/Mama Mask (20th Century) by UnknownOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Kantana mask

The presence of horns on most of the Kantana masks summons the wild buffalos present in the territory. These masks are used in dances with extremely energetic movements contained by ropes that the audience holds.

Mixtec Sculpture (1200 - 1500 AD) by UnknownOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Mixtec Sculpture

This impressive sculpture from the Mixtec peoples may represent Mictlantecuhtli, the Aztec god of the dead. Generally, representations of this deity show him as a skeleton in a state of decomposition, still holding fragments of flesh, able to evoke a dark, gloomy and fetid afterlife, but also an inexhaustible source of regeneration.

Lokapala Sculpture, Han Dynasty (202 BC - 220 AD) by UnknownOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Escultura Lokapala, Dinastia Han

Lokapala is a Sanskrit word that means guardian of the world, referring to the Four Heavenly Kings responsible for protecting each of the four cardinal points against evil spirits.

Buddhist guardians are usually depicted at the gates or at the entrance to temples. The Lokapala are depicted with a terrifying facial expression and wearing the armour according to the style used by the military of the Tang dynasty.

View of the exhibition "Labyrinth and Echo, 2016 (2016) by Tomás Cunha Ferreira and José de GuimarãesOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Contemporary Artists

Discover new exhibitions with interventions from various artists and new dialogues with the permanent collection of José de Guimarães.

View of the exhibition "Type I, II and III Civilizations," 2016 (2014) by Rui ToscanoOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Rui Toscano, "Type I, II and III Civilisations", 2016

Ankh
2014

26 slide projectors, 26 slides
Courtesy of the artist Curated by Nuno Faria

Rui Toscano designs low-tech but high quality compositions on a large scale, creating immersive environments. We think of a science fiction story, in which one could return to our time from a distant future and rediscover the traces of a new space-time dimension. "Ankh" refers to an ancient Egyptian symbol meaning "life".

View of the exhibition "Labyrinth and Echo, 2016 (2016) by Tomás Cunha Ferreira and José de GuimarãesOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Tomás C. Ferreira, "Labyrinth and Echo", 2016

Tomás Cunha Ferreira
ontemporâneo/on temporary
2012-16

Wood, fabric, thread, glass, and other materials.

Courtesy of the artist
José de Guimarães

Untitled (Museum of Luanda)
1967
Painted Hessian fabric
 
Curated by Nuno Faria.

Somewhere between the experiments of the "support-surface" group and the Cut-Outs of Matisse, between Mondrian and Hélio Oiticica, lies the practice of deconstruction and reinvention of painting by Tomás Cunha Ferreira. At CIAJG, the artist proposed a dialogue of his mobile and portable painting with the various spaces and works of the museum. Particularly, with an installation by José de Guimarães entitled "Museum of Luanda”, and originally exhibited in the Angolan city.

View of the exhibition ""Past", 2021 (2021) by Rodrigo HernándezOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Rodrigo Hernández, “Pasado” , 2021

“Pasado”
2021 

Installation

Curated by Marta Mestre

Rodrigo Hernández's projects are characterised by the articulation of complex spatial situations. Paintings, sculptures, floors, wall paintings, environments and wallpapers produce dissonant and polyphonic dialogues. In his exhibition "Pasado", the artist reflects on the condition of museums, not with the purpose of articulating an institutional museological narrative but to constitute a game of fragments where "other" times coexist.

View of the exhibition "Half Eye, Long Face", 2021 (2021) by Pedro HenriquesOriginal Source: Centro Internacional das Artes José de Guimarães

Pedro Henriques, "Half Eye, Long Face", 2021

"Half eye, long face"
2021
Installation (mixed technique on wood)
Courtesy of the artist

Curated by Marta Mestre

Pedro Henriques’ intervention takes place in the African "Hall of Masks" with a number of sculptures that suggest a game between the interior and exterior of the plane, the cut-out and the quality that covers the surface, or, as the artist calls them: the verb (the shape) and the adjective (colour, texture, rhythm). Materiality regains importance and seems to embody possible non-human subjectivities.

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