The sounds of Braga Part II

The popular art, the instruments and the rhythms of a Portuguese city of medieval origin

By Virtual Museum of Lusophony

Canto D'Áqui' at the summer festival in Braga (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

The representative musical heritage of Braga is marked by musicians from different origins who compose the city's soundscape. In this second part of the 'The sounds of Braga' exposition, we present the coverage of the summer music festival in the months of July and September 2020, with some of the main names in the Braga music scene.

We combine sounds of traditional Portuguese music through the typical strings and violas, with the band 'Canto D’Aqui', the music inspired by medieval origin with 'Sons da Suévia', and the Philharmonic 'Banda Musical de Cabreiros', founded in 1843, which teaches wooden instruments, metals and percussion.

The band (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

'Canto D’Aqui' is composed of 11 musicians from Braga. They promote the tradition of Portuguese music, and perform together using typical instruments such ‘violas braguesas’, ‘cavaquinhos’ and flutes.

Musician Jaime Torres (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

The musician Jaime Torres explains the origin and purpose of 'Canto D’Aqui'.

Musician Jaime Torres (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

As a non-profit cultural association, 'Canto D’Aqui' receives invitations from several Portuguese-speaking communities to present traditional Portuguese music.

The band has projects in Galicia and has won, in 2018, the Lusophone Brotherhood Award, in the aRi(t)mar initiative, organized by the Official Language School of Santiago de Compostela University. Its members participate in the cultural week 'Convergências', between Portugal and Galicia, which brings together music, poetry and theater.

Song 'Bate-Bate' (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

The band performing the music 'Bate-bate', during the summer festival.

Medieval fairs. (21th Century) by Edgar LiborioVirtual Museum of Lusophony

'Sons da Suévia' is a band inspired by medieval music, performing period instruments to keep traces of Celtic culture. The influence of rhythm has traces of the collective memory of the city. After the Roman occupation, Braga was taken over by the Suevi, people of Germanic origin, between 409 and 585 A.D., who made it the political and cultural of Galicia.

Medieval inspired instruments (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

Before the band was formed, its members, who admired Celtic music, gathered around the Bom Jesus Sanctuary, located in Braga, to play instruments such as bagpipes. Finally, n 2005, they created the 'Sons da Suévia'.

Bombalhão' (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

The 'bombalhão', a medieval inspired instrument created by the band.

Musician Sérgio Cerdeira (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

Sergio Cerdeira, a piper (bagpipe player) from 'Sons da Suévia'.

Summer festival in Braga (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

The band performs the ‘tarota’, ‘bouzouki’ (string instrument) and ‘timbalão’ (percussion). Excerpt from the presentation of 'Sons da Suévia' at the festival.

Banda de Cabreiros' (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

'Banda Musical de Cabreiros' is a cultural, musical and artistic association, founded in 1843, in Braga. It is the only philharmonic association of the municipality. The 177-year-old orchestra has a music school that receives dozens of students every month of the year.

President of 'Banda de Cabreiros', Carlos Sousa (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

Carlos Sousa, president of the band, talks a little about the children’s preparation for the future.

Banda de Cabreiros' and the school (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

Wood (clarinets, flutes, saxophones, oboe), metals (trumpets, horns, tuba) and percussion (bass, xylophone). All the instruments are taught at the band’s music school.

President of 'Banda de Cabreiros', Carlos Sousa (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

According to Carlos Sousa, the band performs at parties and pilgrimages in Minho, and also participates in international competitions.

Musicians (21th Century) by Tatiane RodriguesVirtual Museum of Lusophony

The musicians from 'Banda de Cabreiros' closed the summer festival in the city of Braga.

Credits: Story

Curatorship: Tatiane Oliveira
Images/video: Tatiane Oliveira
Cover photo: Le Ricou and Edgar Liborio

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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