Meet 3 Ghanaian Artists Reimagining Contemporary Society

A glimpse into the artistic language of Rufai Zakari, Winfred Amoah and Bernice Ameyaw.

By Nubuke Foundation

Emo Eve (Two faces) (2020) by Winfred Nana AmoahOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

A mirror of contemporary Ghanaian society

Ghana is located in the western part of Africa. Its capital city is Accra. After early turbulent years, Ghana is now enjoying a good democratic dispensation. In the past few years, Ghana has emerged as a formidable contemporary art centre with Nubuke Foundation at the heart of it. Here we present three of the most interesting artists working with experimental materials. 

Zakiya (2020) by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

#1: Rufai Zakari 

Based in Accra and Bawku, Zakari examines consumerism, environmental pollution, labour and trade, and the perils of industrialisation in the contemporary Ghanaian society. His art practice involves using found objects including plastic bags, food packages and plastic bottles. He is the founder of the Bawku-based Rujab Eco-art Foundation.

Artist Interview - Rufai Zakari Nubuke Foundation

Mimicking the traditional medium of painting, Zakari’s figurative collages reimagines the women collectors of his art and women that he knows living a life in luxury.

Yellow is the colour (2020) by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

During Ghana's ex-president John Agyekum Kufour's tenure, there were water shortages in many parts of the country. The yellow cans which were synonymous with the shortages are used as a beauty accessories in the artwork.

Melanin II (2020) by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

His figurative collages of fictitious black women celebrate the participant's strength.

Mercy (2020) by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

Emo Eve (Two faces) (2020) by Winfred Nana AmoahOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

#2: Winfred Amoah 

Winfred Nana Amoah (b. 1996, Ghanaian) is a Hohoe-based artist whose media of practice include acrylic paintings, textiles, used credit cards, newspapers, and plastic bags. Amoah uses these materials to explore personal identities and community belonging, particularly in the contemporary Ghanaian context. 

Artist Interview - Winfred Nana Amoah Nubuke Foundation

Amoah’s series of mixed-media depicts the faces of some Hohoe-dwelling people.

Gbledi (Neglected) by Winfred Nana AmoahOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

Seeing these faces, we are left to be ‘accomplices’ in making meaning of these pro-communicative gestures.

Yatsi Me (storm within) (2020) by Winfred Nana AmoahOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

Amoah's piece explores the two extreme sides of the bipolar disorder.

This Exhibition is Untitled, Installation view (2020) by Nii OdzenmaOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

#3: Bernice Ameyaw

Bernice Ameyaw (b. 1993, Ghanaian) lives and works in Kasoa and Kumasi.  She graduated with a BFA in Painting and Sculpture from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi, Ghana (2017).

Bernice Ameyaw Nubuke Foundation

Ameyaw’s practice extends the limitations placed on disused everyday objects.

Chosen Among the Lot (2020) by Bernice AmeyawOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

The objects that she collects are refashioned through various processes including assemblage, riveting, and welding.

This Exhibition is Untitled, Installation view (2020) by Nii OdzenmaOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

The two artworks were part of the exhibition 'This Exhibition is Untitled' (2020) which featured five artists. The exhibition suggested a snapshot of the artists' trajectory beginnings. Using the material conditions of neoliberalism, globalisation and consumerism including plastics, wax prints, call credit cards, hair, bitumen and disused everyday objects.

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The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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