Rufai Zakari: Collaging Ghanaian Women

Portraits expressing carelessness, sassiness, and transgression

By Nubuke Foundation

Rufai Zakari on the trajectory of his practice, current practice, art communities, and the involvement of his family in his practice. The artist uses single-use plastics to make figurative collages.

Artist Interview - Rufai Zakari Nubuke Foundation

Ghanaian artist Rufai Zakari was born in 1990 and is based in Accra and Bawku. His work examines consumerism, environmental pollution, labour and trade, and the perils of industrialisation in the contemporary Ghanaian society.

Yellow is the colour by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

His art practice involves using found objects including plastic bags, food packages and plastic bottles.

Melanin I by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

Mimicking the traditional medium of painting, Zakari’s figurative collages reimagines the women collectors and women living a luxurious lifestyle.

Zakiya by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

The artist fuses plastic scraps, trims them into shapes and forms, and stitches them together using a rope and needle.

Hawa One by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

By transforming the found objects into art, Zakari tries to transform the lives of the women too.

Melanin II by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

Zakari’s woman figurations exist with such carelessness, and sassiness, and transgression.

Janet by Rufai ZakariOriginal Source: Nubuke Foundation

Credits: All media
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