What was Grown Then and Now

From plants to produce: a huge array of flowers, vegetables and fruit are grown in the detached gardens of Hill Close.

By Hill Close Gardens

Plot 17 flower bedsHill Close Gardens

A Variety of Plants

From Victorian bills of sale, drawn up as plots changed hands, we have a good idea of the important plants that were grown. Fruit trees such as apples, pears, plums and quince were prominently noted and appear to be recorded on contemporary maps.

 As well as vegetables including asparagus and sea-kale, our Victorian predecessors were equally proud of their chrysanthemums and carnations. The sale lists tell us that from the start the gardeners of our plots liked to grow flowers for enjoyment as well as fruit and vegetables for the table.

People working in plot 7Hill Close Gardens

The Gardens 100 years ago

Here are just a few of the plants listed in an autumn sale one hundred years ago, when Mr Sidney Hutton sold his plot to Mrs. Margetts:

chrysanthemums, wallflowers, Sweet Williams, beans, peas, pickling cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, celery, beets, potatoes, marrows, leeks, strawberries, and three fruit trees.

Many of the same plant varieties are still being grown here now, providing year round interest.

Flower stallHill Close Gardens

The Gardens Today

Starting from old maps and records, and what has survived on the site for over a century, we have recreated the individual hedged gardens with their exciting diversity of layout and planting. Each plot reflects a different owner’s taste.

Apple treesHill Close Gardens

Fruit trees and more

 Most important historically are the many fruit trees (mostly apple) which have survived from earlier times, including some quite rare varieties. 

ChrysanthemumsHill Close Gardens

To conserve

We also conserve important plants – Chrysanthemums from the National Collection, endangered plants from the Plant Heritage exchange, and a collection of over one hundred varieties of snowdrops.   

Aerial View 1945Hill Close Gardens

Through the years

The Gardens Today - Starting from old maps and records, and what has survived on the site for over a century, we have recreated the individual hedged gardens with their exciting diversity of layout and planting.  

Arial view of plot 24Hill Close Gardens

Restore - create and move forward

Each plot reflects a different owner’s taste. Most important historically are the many fruit trees (mostly apple) which have survived from earlier times, including some quite rare varieties. 

Snowdrops for saleHill Close Gardens

We also conserve important plants – Chrysanthemums from the National Collection, endangered plants from the Plant Heritage exchange, and a collection of over one hundred varieties of snowdrops.     

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