Pop art

User-created

This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.

Pop Art is a movement that was born in 1950 in Britain and later on the United States. It means the popular culture Art. It was the art movement that characterized a sense of optimism during the post war consumer boom and its purpose it to use objects of the daily life and create art works with it. The Pop art movement aimed to blur the boundaries between "high" art and "low" culture. Pop art employs aspects of mass culture, such as advertising, comic books and mundane cultural objects; it was the first school of art to reflect the power of film and television. The features of the Pop Art artworks were: clear lines, sharp paintwork and clear representations of symbols, people, objects found in popular culture and its bright colors.

I decided to do my gallery of this topic because it is not just only about the art, it is about how it portrays a socio-political influence at the time and how “insignificant” objects of our lives can have a deep meaning, also it teaches us that our culture is an spectacle. On the other hand, I think that Pop Art led to the beginning of marketing such as we now nowadays. For example, Apple and Google both have used Pop Art in their advertising because the visual impact of the bright colors. Having considered all of this, I conclude that this movement was vital for the modern art   and  it’s impossible to ignore, it’s absolutely everywhere you go, you just have to see artists of today like Romero Britto who has a lot of influence of this movement.

Self Portrait, Andy Warhol, 1967, From the collection of: Detroit Institute of Arts
The Mellow Pad, Stuart Davis, 1945-1951, From the collection of: Brooklyn Museum
Portrait of Dolores Olmedo, David Hockney, From the collection of: Museo Dolores Olmedo
Alka Seltzer, Roy Lichtenstein (American, 1923-1997), 1966, From the collection of: The Art Institute of Chicago
Daiquiri room, Heras Sanz, Artur, 2001/2001, From the collection of: Universidad Pública de Navarra
A True Story About Joseph Beuys No. 3 (This Is a Fascist German Military Pilot Joseph Beuys), Kęstutis Grigaliūnas, 1998, From the collection of: MO Museum / MO muziejus
Red Barn, Roy Lichtenstein, 1969, From the collection of: Huntington Museum of Art
A True Story About Joseph Beuys No. 1, Kęstutis Grigaliūnas, 1998, From the collection of: MO Museum / MO muziejus
A True Story About Joseph Beuys No. 5 (Red Pilot Shot His Plane. The Plane Falls and Breaks), Kęstutis Grigaliūnas, 1998, From the collection of: MO Museum / MO muziejus
Bicentennial Print, Roy Lichtenstein, 1975, From the collection of: Inter-American Development Bank
Artist's Studio, Patrick Caulfield, 1964, From the collection of: Arts Council Collection
Better Living Through Windows, Douglas Coupland, 2013, From the collection of: Vancouver Art Gallery
Still Life with Twitter, Douglas Coupland, 2012, From the collection of: Vancouver Art Gallery
Olympic Column, Burton Morris, 2001, From the collection of: The Olympic Museum
Broadway Boogie Woogie 1943, Piet Mondrian 1872-1944, Douglas Coupland, 2011, From the collection of: Vancouver Art Gallery
Image Duplicator, John Leongard, 1963, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
John Leongard, 1963, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Art: Andy Warhol, Henry Groskinsky, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Art: Andy Warhol, Henry Groskinsky, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Time Covers -The 80S, 1984-03-19, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Time Covers -The 80S, 1985-04, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
1986-09-29, From the collection of: LIFE Photo Collection
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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