Mountain Dew japan

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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.

This gallery contains various paintings of the beautiful mountains of Japan. There are hundreds of mountains in Japan. For all my hiking lovers If you ever decide to take a trip to Japan. Look out for these lovely mountains and see what inspired these paintings. So journey forth and venture into the gallery!

Lake Contours, Hakone, from the series the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido (Hoeido edition), Utagawa Hiroshige, ca.1833, From the collection of: Nakagawa-machi bato hiroshige art of museum
The Lake Contours, Hakone, from the series the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido (Hoeido edition) by Utagawa Hiroshige was multi-color woodblock print w37.6 x h24 cm. The artwork displays the path in between the mountains. The shapes of the Sacred mountains of Hakone portray a treacherous pass for the travelers.
Mt. Fuji, Yokoyama Taikan, 1940, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
Mt. Fuji (1940) by Yokoyam Taikan was a hanging scroll/ color on paper w1155 x h803cm. This piece was painted in commemoration of the 2,600th anniversary of the found of Japan and the 50th year of Taikan's painting career. This painting was expression of love for Japan. Mt. Fuji looks majestic being pure white. The space of the clouds make the mountain look bigger, also the red color of the sun makes the painting seem more divine.
Distant Views of Famous Mountains and Cherry Blossoms in Kumagaya on a Round Trip Train to Takasaki, Kunimasa UTAGAWA Ⅴ, 1884 - 1884, From the collection of: Saitama Prefectual Museum of History and Folklore
Distant Views of Famous Mountains and Cherry Blossoms by Kunimasa Utagawa V was created in 1884. This piece of artwork depicts the scenery travelers could watch from the trains windows, such as the various mountains including: Mt. Fuji, Mt. Chichi, Mt. Myogi, Mt. Haruma, and Mt. Akagi. The red color of the sunset in the background really makes the mountains look grand and a very beautiful for anyone taking a train ride through Japan from Tokyo all the way to Takasaki!
Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido Hoeido Edition “Keishi (Great Sanjo Bridge)”, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833, From the collection of: Shizuoka city Tokaido Hiroshige Museum of Art
The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido Hoeido Edition "Keishi (Great Sanjo Bridge)" was painted by Utagawa Hiroshige in 1833. The painting shows the great bridge, but in the background you can see the Higashiyama Mountains the red and blue colors create depth in this painting. This is another visual masterpiece.
Yugyoji Temple, Fujisawa, from the series the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido (Hoeido edition), Utagawa Hiroshige, ca.1833, From the collection of: Nakagawa-machi bato hiroshige art of museum
Yugyoji Temple, Fujisawa, from the series the Fifty-three stations of the Tokaido. 1833 by Utagawa Hiroshige. This piece of art shows the middle of the mountain range. There are a group of mountain worshippers from the Yugyoji Temple. This piece shows linear perspective as you can see the Temple just after the mountains bend.
One Hundred Famous Views of Edo “New Fuji in Meguro”, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1857, From the collection of: Shizuoka city Tokaido Hiroshige Museum of Art
One-Hundred Famous Views of Edo "New Fuji in Meguro" by Utagawa Hiroshige in 1857. This painting shows people worshipping Fujizuka mountain or "Shin-Fuji". The mountain was created after the great Mt. Fuji. People in Japan worshipped their mountains and created beautiful scenery with their use of white and red showing the vastness of the sunset and the grandeur of the sky with the mountain in the background in all its glory.
The Sadness of the Rain, Oiso, from the series the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido (Hoeido edition), Utagawa Hiroshige, ca.1833, From the collection of: Nakagawa-machi bato hiroshige art of museum
The Sadness of the Rain, Oiso, from the series the Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido (Hoeido edition) by Utagawa Hiroshige in 1833. The final piece I chose from the Fifty-three stations series shows Mt. Komayama. Unlike the previous ones the colors used in this painting are a much darker shade to evoke the emotion of sadness that is cause from the rain. The rain is depicted by vertical lines that almost look like scratches on the artwork, but the artist did a very good job at capturing a moving moving rain in a still image.
Sakai Dōitsu, Mt Fuji and Pines, a hanging scroll painting, 1850/1899, From the collection of: British Museum
Mt. Fuji and Pines by Sakai Doitsu (1850-1899). The painting shows Mt. Fuji. This painting uses a colorful treatment using "tarashi-komi" a technique where ink is dripped onto areas of still-wet paint to create a puddled effect. Dry brushwork is also used in the painting to show that the mountain is vanishing in the mist.
Taima Temple Mandala: Amida Welcomes Chûjôhime to the Western Paradise, Artist Unknown, Japan, Japan, Muromachi Period (1333-1573), From the collection of: University of Michigan Museum of Art
Taima Temple Mandala: Amida Welcomes Chujohime to the Western Paradise (1333-1573). This painting shows the Nijo mountain with the Taima Temple in the center. The spacing of all the aspects of this painting is required to show everything in one piece of work.
Twelve Views of the Japan Alps"Mt. Hodaka", YOSHIDA Hiroshi, 1926, From the collection of: Fukuoka Art Museum
Twelve Views of the Japan Alps "Mt. Hodaka" (1926) by Yoshida Hiroshi. The colors used in this painting really take my breath away from the use of dark colors on the left side to show the over shadow of the mountain. While you can tell the sun is shining on the right side and creating the reflection of the mountain in the river.
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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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