Art & Artifacts

Explore art & artifacts from the National Army Museum and from across the Army Museum Enterprise with direct connections to September 11, 2001, and the Global War on Terrorism.

By National Museum of the United States Army

Due to the sensitive nature, and considering the time frame and equipment with which they were captured, the majority of the photographs used in this exhibit will appear pixelated.

From the collection of the National Museum of the United States Army

The National Museum of the United States Army celebrates over 245 years of Army history and honors our nation's Soldiers - past, present, and future - the Regular Army, the Army Reserve, and the Army National Guard.

National Museum of the United States Army
1775 Liberty Drive
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060

Melted Coin Cluster (1998) by U.S. MintNational Museum of the United States Army

Melted Coins

These coins were recovered from the Pentagon following the attacks by a team of U.S. Army Center of Military History (CMH) curators. There is plastic melted onto the coins that is believed to be from the container the coins were in. 

Landing Gear Fragment (Early-21st Century) by American Airlines or United AirlinesNational Museum of the United States Army

Landing Gear Fragment

This fragment is from the lower portion of a landing gear strut. It is from one of the aircraft that struck the World Trade Center.  It was retrieved during the debris recovery operation, which was a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project. 

Pocket Bible, International Bible Society, 1999-09, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Door Plate, Unknown, 2001, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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U.S. Flag, U.S. Army, 1998, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Wrist Watch, Unknown, 2001, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Decorative Ring, Unknown, 2000, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Joint Chiefs of Staff Badge, 1999, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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From the collection at The Pentagon

The Pentagon
1400 Defense Blvd
Washington, D.C. 20301

Dedication Stone, West Section, Department of Defense, 2001-09-11, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Dedication Stone, West Section, Department of Defense, 2001-09-11, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Stemming the Tide, John M. Carland, 2000, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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From the collection of the Army Museum Enterprise

Missing Flight Recorders Poster (Early-21st Century) by Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)National Museum of the United States Army

Missing Flight Recorders Poster

This FBI poster was created for the World Trade Center site in New York City, alerting those in the recovery efforts to be on the lookout for any of the missing “black box” flight recorders from the planes.

Writing Pad, U.S. Army, Early-21st Century, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Pentagon Stone, Department of Defense, Early-21st Century, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Floppy Disk, Unknown, 2001, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Federal Bureau of Investigation Evidence Bag, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), 1998, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Combat Boots, Unknown, 1997, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Appreciation (2001-09) by Branden MorganNational Museum of the United States Army

Handmade Patriotic Card

This handmade card was made by Branden Morgan, a child living in New York City at the time. The inside reads, “Thank you forevery thing you have done for the U.S.A. and for saving all those people you have saved good luck.”

Gratitude, Hancock Elementary School, Fourth Grader, 2001-09-20, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Thank You, Branden Morgan, 2001-09, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Encouragement, Hancock Elementary School, Fourth Grader, 2001-09-20, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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United States National Flag (2001-09-14) by U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Cedric H. RudisillNational Museum of the United States Army

United States National Flag

This U.S. flag was unfurled over the west wall of the Pentagon on September 12, 2001, by Soldiers and firefighters working the recovery efforts. It remained there until October 11, 2001, when it was lowered and folded with full military honors.

United States National Flag, Unknown, 2000, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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United States National Flag, Petty Officer 1st Class Michael W. Pendergrass, 2001-09-12, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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From the collection of the 10th Mountain & Fort Drum Museum

Beginning with the native peoples and covering the arrival of the U.S. Army into the North Country of New York, the Museum covers the development of the installation through the present and the history of the 10th Mountain Division from its inception in the mountains of Colorado to its wartime baptism in the mountains of Italy. Also told is the modern history of the Division, where it becomes the most deployed division in the U.S. Army, including numerous wartime tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.

10th Mountain Division & Fort Drum Museum
P2509 COL Reade Road
Fort Drum, NY 13602
Phone: (315) 774-0253

Following the September 11 attacks, it was determined that al Qaeda was utilizing Afghanistan as a base of operations. In response, on October 7, 2001, President George W. Bush announced that airstrikes targeting al Qaeda and the Taliban had begun in Afghanistan staring Operation Enduring Freedom. The first large scale conventional battle took place between March 2 and March 16, 2002 in the Shahi-Kot Valley and was known as Operation Anaconda.

Afghan Helmet, al Qaeda, Late-20th Century, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Anaconda Patch, Daughter of Dennis Sullivan, Unknown, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Watch Cap, Unknown, 2021, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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From the collection of the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps Museum

Always present with Soldiers in war and in peace, the Chaplain Corps provides religious support to America's Army by nurturing the living, caring for the wounded, and honoring the fallen. That story is told at the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps Museum.

U.S. Army Chaplain Corps Museum
10100 Lee Road
Fort Jackson, SC 29207
Phone: (803) 751-8079/8827

U.S. Flag & Piece of the Pentagon Wall, 2001, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Menorah, Unknown, 2001-11, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Christian Chaplain Kit (Combat Assault Kit Model), Natick Labs, 2001, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Chap. (Capt.) Timothy Mallard's Journal, Chap. (Col.) Timothy Mallard, 2001, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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American Airlines Flight 77 Fragments, American Airlines, 2001-09-11, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Pocket Bible, The Gideons International, 2001, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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From the collection of the U.S. Army Artillery Museum

Opened June 2, 2009, the U.S. Army Artillery Museum tells the story of Artillery from 1775 to the present with over 70 guns and artillery pieces and numerous other artifacts from head gear and ammo to small arms and uniforms.

U.S. Army Artillery Museum
238 Randolph Rd
Fort Sill, OK 73503
Phone: (580) 442-1819

World Trade Center I-Beam (2001-09-11)National Museum of the United States Army

World Trade Center I-Beam

This short section of mangled I-Beam was recovered from the World Trade Center.

Artist-in-Residence (2015) by U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryNational Museum of the United States Army

The Army Art Program

In every era, Army Artists have forged deep connections with Soldiers. Today’s Army Artists serve as documentary historians to promote esprit de corps throughout the ranks by portraying Soldiers who make great and small sacrifices for their country.

The Army Art Program

“Any subject is in order… the nobility, courage, cowardice, cruelty, boredom of war; all this should form part of a well-rounded picture… Express if you can, realistically or symbolically, the essence and spirit of war.”
– George Biddle, Chairman of War Department Art Advisory Committee

George Biddle, artist and founder of the depression era Federal Art Project, outlined the mission of the Army’s World War II combat artists and his inspiration remains relevant today. Since World War I, the Army has embedded Soldier and civilian artists with troops to participate in their lives and document their findings in art. These Army Artists have had great latitude in their choice of subject matter, covering everything from the dangers of combat to the Soldier’s daily routine.

In every era, Army Artists have forged deep connections with Soldiers. They immerse themselves in troop life and witness personal connections among Soldiers. Today’s Army Artists serve as documentary historians to promote esprit de corps throughout the ranks by portraying Soldiers who make great and small sacrifices for their country. In an era in which the Army’s activities are well-documented by photography, both by professional photographers and the cell phones of individual soldiers, Army Artists offer yet another visual medium to record the Army’s history and to elevate both the heroic and the mundane details of daily life to the status of “fine art.”

Plan Accordingly (2002) by Col. Gary N. CassidyNational Museum of the United States Army

Plan Accordingly

Gary Cassidy served in Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, and peacekeeping efforts in Bosnia. He deployed to Bosnia as an Army Artist and produced a number of paintings and sketches. He produced this painting of the damaged Pentagon shortly after the attack of September 11, 2001.

September 11 (2001) by M. Sgt. Henrietta SnowdenNational Museum of the United States Army

September 11

This pastel drawing portrays the damaged Pentagon on September 11, 2001. M. Sgt. Snowden was the Army’s Artist-in-Residence at the time of the terrorist attacks and created this artwork while the images of devastation were fresh in her mind.

Waiting to Go to War, M. Sgt. Henrietta Snowden, 2002, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Point of No Return, 1st Lt. Heather Englehart, 2004, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Heading Out (2010) by M. Sgt. Martin CervantezNational Museum of the United States Army

Heading Out

This atmospheric watercolor painting depicts a squad of the 101st Airborne Division heading “out of the wire” on a patrol near Forward Operating Base Gardez in northeastern Afghanistan in fall 2008.

Street Fight, Sfc. Elzie Golden, 2003, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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A Huge Responsibility, M. Sgt. Martin Cervantez, 2009, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Liberator, Sfc. Elzie Golden, 2003, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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The Hazara Province (2003) by Sfc. Elzie GoldenNational Museum of the United States Army

The Hazara Province

In this painting, Artist-in-Residence Sfc. Golden depicts Special Forces troops patrolling in the region of the Hazara tribe in Afghanistan. As he was unable to deploy with this group, the artist used photos as reference to create the painting.

Haifa Street, Baghdad, M. Sgt. Christopher Thiel, 2008, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Patrolling the Vineyard, M. Sgt. Martin Cervantez, 2012, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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I'll Be Fine Guys (2019) by Sfc. Juan MuñozNational Museum of the United States Army

I'll Be Fine Guys

This watercolor portrays three Soldiers carrying a wounded comrade to safety. The wounded Soldier holds up his left hand in a “thumbs-up” gesture from his stretcher, indicating to his friends that he will be fine, as the title of the painting indicates.

Big Country, 1st Lt. Heather Englehart, 2004, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Waiting to Phone Home, M. Sgt. Henrietta Snowden, 2000, From the collection of: National Museum of the United States Army
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Credits: Story

Army Museum Enterprise
The Pentagon

U.S. Army Chaplain Corps Museum 
10th Mountain & Fort Drum Museum
U.S. Army Artillery Museum



Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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