Blooms

An exhibition on mathematics, nature, and perception by John Edmark

By Sinaloa Science Center

Materia, Sinaloa Science Center Museum

Blooms Exhibition Poster, Materia, Sinaloa Science Center Museum, 2020-01-20, From the collection of: Sinaloa Science Center
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Blooms Exhibition (2020-01-20) by John EdmarkSinaloa Science Center

The four sculptures found in the exhibition were 3D printed by John Edmark, who is an artist and mathematician and who is currently investigating the relationship between design and computer science at Stanford University

Detail of Blooms (2020-01-20) by John EdmarkSinaloa Science Center

Each of the sculptures was designed, taking as inspiration the numerical properties that exist in nature

Blooms exhibition by John EdmarkSinaloa Science Center

Here we can see the conjunction between nature and mathematics. These patterns respond to a mathematical phenomenon: the Fibonacci Sequence; Fibonacci was the way they called Leonardo de Pisa, who made the sequence known in the West in the 13th century, long before was known India. The Fibonacci sequence also inspires in the work of Leonardo Da Vinci, The Vitruvian Man. 've you seen?

Hitchcock Directing (1959) by Gjon MiliLIFE Photo Collection

An Artichoke is transformed into kinetic sculpture (2014-10-01) by John EdmarkSinaloa Science Center

Observe the geometric pattern in the arrangement of the leaves. Each new sheet is placed 137.5 degrees from the center of the old one.

Detail of Blooms Exhibition (2020-01-20) by John EdmarkSinaloa Science Center

It is the use of the golden ratio in the sculptures that makes us see movement. The rotation speed of each sculpture synchronizes with the strobe light that emits a flash every 137.5 degrees, what is the angle of the golden ratio and how we said defines geometric patterns in nature.

Cactus as a kinetic sculpture (2015-04-11) by John EdmarkSinaloa Science Center

These spiral patterns are used by various plants such as chrysanthemums or sunflowers and in artichokes, pineapples as a growth strategy.

Bloom's kinetic sculptures (2015-02-10) by John EdmarkSinaloa Science Center

The rotation speed of each sculpture synchronizes with the strobe light that emits a flash every 137.5 degrees -the golden angle-

Detail of a kinetic sculpture (2020-01-20) by John EdmarkSinaloa Science Center

John Edmark

He is a professor at Stanford University in California, USA. He has been an academic researcher of virtual environments for several years. His artistic work is directly related to mathematical thinking. Develops kinetic sculptures and transformable objects built with geometric rigor

Blooms Exhibit Poster (2020-01-20) by Materia, Museo del Centro de Ciencias de SinaloaSinaloa Science Center

View of Blooms exhibition (2020-01-20) by Materia, the Museum of Sinaloa Science CenterSinaloa Science Center

Materia Logo (2020-01-20) by Materia, Sinaloa Science Center MuseumSinaloa Science Center

Credits: Story

Blooms by John Edmark is part of the inaugural cycle of Materia, the Sinaloa Science Center Museum.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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