Light ≅ Matter (Matter)

Oscar Niemeyer Museum

By Oscar Niemeyer Museum

Visual arts

They will pass, they will pass, but the last one will stay (1996) by Alfi VivernOscar Niemeyer Museum

This exhibition represents the second (and last) segment of the Light ≅ Matter project. This project, which gathers a selection of works belonging to our museum, distances itself from the conventional way in which the collections are exhibited, the gathering of works by schools and artistic groups from chronological criteria. In contrast, Light ≅ Matter teaches us that there are infinite ways of approaching works of art, as well as any objects, or even the relevant events scattered throughout our lives. By: Agnaldo Farias

Untitled (1996) by Alfi VivernOscar Niemeyer Museum

Untitled (1996) by Alfi VivernOscar Niemeyer Museum

The prose of the world III, Lígia Borba, 2001, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Memento Mori (2002) by José RufinoOscar Niemeyer Museum

Memento Mori (2002) by José RufinoOscar Niemeyer Museum

"Memento Mori" is an exemplar of the production that José Rufino realized with objects of his grandfather. A stain on the paper, remembering the shroud, stretches out along the bed, setting the idea of death, reinforced by the title "Memento Mori," a Latin term meaning something like "remember you're going to die."

We are Texas (from the “We are America” series) (2005) by Carlos ColombinoOscar Niemeyer Museum

We are Texas refers to the turbulent process of annexation of Texas, the former region of Mexico, by the United States, which resulted in the war between the two countries (1846), leaving the United States victorious and in the right to annex other Mexican regions , like California, thus completing its march to the west. The image resembles a cannon or battering ram, an object used in the Old Age and in the Middle Ages to break through the gates of walled towns or castles. Phallic resemblance also refers to sexual violence, to abuse, something that refers to the violence of one country over another.

Upholstered I, Bernadete Amorim, 2011, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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The comeback, Carina Weidle, 2000, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Subterranean Similarities, Carina Weidle, 2002, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Detritus (2005) by Carlos ColombinoOscar Niemeyer Museum

Carlos Colombino conceived, in 1962, the technique known as xilopintura, which consists of digging the wood, as if it were the matrix of a woodcut, and then painting it. Instead of using it, therefore, to get prints, it becomes the end product. The work "Detritus" was present at the exhibition "Carlos Colombino - Summary of an Anthology" at the Oscar Niemeyer Museum in 2006. It is part of a series that represents the empty planet, where the Earth was devastated and only debris, remains . Series inspired by Cerro Koi, a rocky outcrop located in Areguá, Paraguay.

Infinity and a little bit more, João Osorio Brzezinski, 1963, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Null space, João Osorio Brzezinski, 1967, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Caipira Vision IV (1970's) by João Osorio BrzezinskiOscar Niemeyer Museum

With "Caipiras Objects", João Osorio Brzezinski shows how it would be the creation of high-tech objects made by a country man, like a color TV, something that did not exist in the 1960s in Brazil, where even black and white TV access was restricted. Such creations would, of course, be made with household objects such as basins, jars, crockery and other plastic utensils. The works were inspired by a scene from the movie "Mondo Cane" (1962) and are examples of Modernism in the plastic arts of Paraná.

Caipira Vision III, João Osorio Brzezinski, 1970's, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Caipira Object 02, João Osorio Brzezinski, 1971, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Planet queen (1990/2010) by Efigênia RolimOscar Niemeyer Museum

It was by chance that Efigênia Rolim began to produce art. It was only in 1991 that she saw a bullet paper glittering in the sun so that she would be enchanted by that simple beauty. From there, she began to turn bullet papers into plastic flowers to then decorate with them doll dresses and then her own dresses. His idea expanded and production grew for larger objects and sculptures, all made from recyclable material.The work "Rainha do Planeta" represents a spirit of the protective nature of the planet.

Planet queen (1990/2010) by Efigênia RolimOscar Niemeyer Museum

Rural Constructivism Series, Nelson Leirner, 1999, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Cup-and-ball, Elvo Benito Damo, 1996, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Untitled (2006) by Francisco FariaOscar Niemeyer Museum

The peculiarity of the work of Francisco Faria consists, according to the artist, in the attempt to obtain "violent contrasts within a clearer and more homogeneous presentation." And he does it with the aid of rubber, composing whites and blacks very close, without gradations of tones. Since 1985, Francisco Faria started to devote himself to drawing, using it for the representation of landscapes, mainly of the Atlantic Forest and sea scenes.

The singing of the earth (1992) by Flávio ShiróOscar Niemeyer Museum

The work "O Canto da Terra", with suggestions of a grotesque figure, is consistent with the production made from the 1970s by the Japanese resident in Brazil since 1932 Flávio Shiró. It was held in 1992 especially for Eco Art, an exhibition promoted by Banco Bozano, Simonsen, on the occasion of Eco 92, United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, in Rio de Janeiro. The 50 Brazilian painters and 70 others from other countries of America should carry out works inspired by ecology and the preservation of nature.

Sea scene, Miguel Bakun, 1940/1960, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Yellow tree, Miguel Bakun, 1940/1960, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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The docks, Miguel Bakun, 1940/1960, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Detective (2007) by Daniel SeniseOscar Niemeyer Museum

The recognizable monotypes taken from the floor began when Daniel Senise noticed on the back of the canvas that he had spread an image formed by the reminiscence of the paints that had deposited there.

Later, these monotypes in earthy tones, decals of real places, such as the space of his atelier or museums, began to be cut manually and with the strips the artist began to create suggestions of scenarios.

Árbol adentro, Pilar Ovalle, 2005, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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The circle, Siron Franco, 1996, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Photographic Record of the Exhibition Light = Matter, Mario Rubinski, 2019, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Comparison of values III – 8th series (1978) by Antonio ArneyOscar Niemeyer Museum

By chance, Antonio Arney found, in the mid-1960s, some rusty bolts in his atelier. The color of the rust pleased him; he decided to fix them on the screen that was ending, increased with a glue and, at the end, passed a dark liquid. Thus began to define the language of this self-taught artist, whose creation process consists of finding the materials, testing their resistance, preparing them and, finally, adjusting them. The necessary abstract forms of composition, however, arise from the artist's measured use of colors.

Comparison of values VII, Antonio Arney, 1978, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Montage I, Antonio Arney, 2004, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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The body (1984) by Didonet ThomazOscar Niemeyer Museum

Between visits and researches in the Museu Histórico de Joinville (Historical Museum of Joinville) (SC) , Didonet Thomaz ran into an ancient wardrobe; when he opened it, he found himself in a solitary, hung-up blouse, which was also very old and strangely inflated, as if it were still filled with a body. From there she began to study the piece and to represent it with ink, gouache and cutouts on paper. The work "O Corpo" ("The Body") is more a fruit of the artist's interest in historical research combined with the meticulous work, small but complete and intense.

Interpretations, Annette Skarbek, 1983/1984, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Landscape, Waldemar Roza, 1940/1950, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Untitled (1960/1970) by Waldemar RozaOscar Niemeyer Museum

Lyricism III, Waldemar Roza, 1962, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Painting II, Fernando Calderari, 1969, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Creme engraving, Rossini Perez, 1965, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Suture, Rossini Perez, 1966, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Marine, Fernando Calderari, 1970, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Holy Supper (1960/1990) by Luiz Carlos de Andrade LimaOscar Niemeyer Museum

Leaving in search of the imaginary, Fernando Velloso, 1989, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Evocation of symbolic elements, Fernando Velloso, 1990, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
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Credits: Story

Light ≅ Matter

Part I - "Light"

Curatorship: Agnaldo Farias
Promotion: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Room: 3

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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